Easy Valentine Piano Music

Valentine Music_Revised

This post has links to all of the Valentine music currently on my website.

Remember last year when I posted these links?  Well, as some of you know, I’ve been trying to revise all my pre-reading and primer level music to vertical (portrait) orientation, rather than horizontal (landscape). The reason I put this level in landscape in the first place is that there is more room for big notes. But it is so hard to use in a 3-ring binder! I’m determined to eventually remake all of my landscape scores!

Question of the day: Do you like the borders I draw? Do you think they add something, or do they make it harder to print. I’m just curious what other teachers think.

Valentines Day PR  – pre-reading with finger numbers only, on the black keys.

Roses are Red – pre-reading with finger numbers only, on the black keys.

Chocolate Valentines Pre-reading version is played on the white keys using all the fingers.

Chocolate Valentines On the Staff  came about because one of my students saw the pre-reading version and asked me to make one for her on the staff. We made it longer by playing it several times, each time in a different octave.

Here are the rest of the Valentine’s Day folk songs from my website that that I have arranged in various levels.

Love Somebody, Yes I Do – Late Elementary (with 8th notes)

Love Somebody, Yes I Do – Primer Level (5-finger position on the staff)

Love Somebody, Yes I Do – Pre-reading

There’s a Little Wheel A-Turning in My Heart –  Early Intermediate (lots of hands together and some finger substitutions)

Below is the graphic I made last year. All the music on the left is now in portrait orientation!

8 Valentine Pieces

8 Valentine Pieces

 

 

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Filed under Holiday Music, Pre-reading, Valentine's Day

Rhythm Race Music Game for Intermediate and Elementary Levels

RhythmRace

Rhythm Race Game Board

Intermediate Rhythm Race Cards

Easy Rhythm Race Cards

(I reposted these files to include the “sentence” cards that I accidentally left off. You will need to reload the page to see the new files.)

Rhythm Race is a quick game for 2 or more players. I made the game for students who are learning to count more difficult rhythms, such as dotted eighth notes and triplets. Students count the rhythms on their card, and then move to a note on the game board that equals that value. After my intermediate students played Rhythm Race, I noticed they were noticeably improved in their ability to count difficult rhythms.

I designed this game for older students, but when some of my younger ones saw it, they wanted a version, too!

The cards are designed for a business card template, but you can use card stock and cut them out. I found a good deal on photo paper at a discount store, so I laminated that for the game board, and it really pops out the colors.

Print only the front (the rhythm cards) for the level you need. Then reinsert the cards and print the back design, – the cards with checkered flags.  I find it necessary to have the backs of each level a different color so I can quickly get the correct cards ready for a student.

If you are playing with different ages in a group lesson, students can draw from their theory level and still play together.

Objective

  • To review rhythms, including dotted eighth notes and sixteenths notes

 Ages

  • Grades 1-7, using the appropriate level cards

 Number of Players

  • Two or more players. The teacher can play with a student, or students can play in a group lesson

Materials

  • Game board and rhythm card printables
  • A  small token for each player

Directions

  • Print the game board. Print the cards on one side and then Mui and print on the back of the cards. Separate or cut the cards.
  • Mix the cards up so that the sentence cards are mixed evenly with the rhythm cards.
  • Each player puts their token on “start”. The first player draws a card and counts the rhythm. Moving clockwise, the student moves his/her token to the first note on the board with the same value as their card.
  • Decide how many “laps” are need to win.  One lap takes about 5 minutes. Remove some of the penalty cards to speed up the game.
  • Players take turns drawing cards and moving their token on the board.
  • If all the cards are used, shuffle and keep playing.
  • The first player to pass “start” is the winner.

Why I Like This Game

  • It doesn’t take much lesson time.
  • When I play this game with students, I discover right away what they know and what they need work on. So it is like a worksheet or achievement test, only a lot more fun!

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Filed under Games, Group lesson ideas, Older Students, Rhythm

Six Secrets of Successful Music Teachers

What makes a successful music teacher? I have observed and listened to many very successful teachers over the years. I am so fortunate to personally know many outstanding teachers, and I have learned from them. These are teachers of all ages who have studios full of students, including beginners and long-time advanced high school students. Here is what I discovered:

  • They have goals.
  • They are flexible, but not door-mats.
  • They don’t rigidly follow method books.
  • They don’t complain and they don’t make excuses.
  • They are willing to learn more and keep up to date.
  • They love their work and they do more than just teach.

Teaching music is hard. There are so many factors that we as teachers cannot control. Music is enjoyable,  yet it is hard to learn to read and it is hard to learn the coordination involved in playing an instrument. We teach because we love it and we want to share our love of music. It’s also how we make our living. This is a lot to balance and it is understandable that we get frustrated at times. However, we stay positive and carry on! I hope everyone reading this has a great teaching year!

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Jingle Bells Duet with Rhythm Instruments

Christmas Rhythm Instruments

Jingle Bells Duet With Rhythm Instruments

 

Does anyone remember this arrangement I made for my students a few years ago? There is an early intermediate piano part, an easy one hand duet, and parts for 4 rhythm instruments.

What is new in this PDF is that I added individual scores for the rhythm instruments. I received many requests for that and I’m finally getting around to it! All the pages are combined into one PDF and you can print what you need.

If you are having group lessons this week or next, there is still time to print this out for your students. The rhythm instrument parts are for beginners and no practice is necessary.

The piano part also stands alone as a piano solo without the duet or the rhythm instruments. Or you can use the piano part out of a Christmas book.

The easy duet part can also be played on an electric bass, a keyboard, melody bells or any other tuned instrument that sounds good with your piano.

What I like about this arrangement is that there is something for everyone, so if you happen to have group lessons with all levels, every student will have something to do.

I also thought this would be fun for a musical family to play when they get together for the holidays. If you don’t have any rhythm instruments, improvise with whatever you have around the house! Here is a set of rhythm instruments from my Amazon affiliate site that has free shipping now.  I use my set of rhythm instruments frequently in my teaching, but especially around the Christmas holidays!

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Filed under Christmas, Group lesson ideas, Holiday Music