Bats and Cats Note Board Game

Bats and Cats Note Game

Bats and Cats Note Board Game – 6 page file including note flash cards

Keyboard cards to use with Bats and Cats game

Bats and Cats Keyboard Cards – one page

One of the reasons I started making my own games years ago is because I couldn’t find any affordable games for piano students that could be played in 5 minutes.  I need games that don’t take longer than going through flash cards.

After I made the LadyBug game and discovered how much students like it yet how well it helps students learn notes, I started making variations of it for different times of the year. [If you would prefer some Fall games without the Halloween theme, here is the link to some. Fall Music Games. I’ve also made a lot of Thanksgiving games.]

But I added a twist to this version: The Card of Doom!

I originally posted this several years ago without the keyboard flash cards which are posted above in a separate file. You can use the other cards along with it. When I plan to use this game I post a sign on my door that says, “Beware the Card of Doom.” Of course my students know it’s just a joke.

The original file contains 6 pages:

  • The board game
  • The optional colorful back
  • Three pages of flash cards
  • Fun directional cards, including the Card of Doom

How to Print

  • Set your printer to landscape. For a fabulous looking game board, use photo paper and laminate.
  • Insert photo paper to print the game board. When the print box opens up, under “Pages to Print” select “Pages.” In the dialog box, type “1” because you are only printing the first page. Set it aside to dry.
  • Insert card stock to print the cards. Under “Pages to Print” select “Pages” again and type “2-5.” If you can only print one page of card stock at a time, type a different number for each page.
  • To print the back of the flash cards, re-insert the printed card pages so that you will be printing on the back. Under “Pages to Print” select “Pages” and type “6” because it is the 6th page that has the colorful back. [To keep from wasting ink, be sure you know how to do this. See my FAQ. ]

Directions

This game can be played with students only, or teacher and student. The players take turns drawing cards and moving to the correct alphabet name. Mix up the note cards with the instruction cards.  The game is over when a player draws any note card after the last D. I try to make sure the students win more than they lose, so sometimes I have to get creative!

Objectives

  • To reinforce or learn note names on the staff
  • To learn the word “octave.”

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Filed under Games, Halloween, Note Identification

The Boy Who Didn’t Like Halloween, Two Levels with Duet

The Boy Who Didn't Like Halloween

The Boy Who Didn’t Like Halloween  $3.99  Two Versions, Three Scores Included

Unlimited Printing Within Your Studio

Level One Version mp3 with Duet

Students Love Halloween Music!

They also like funny songs. The Boy Who Didn’t Like Halloween is a child-centered piece for students from first to fourth grade. I wrote it like a ballad, so I tell my students it is a song to play on the piano. The words are funny and my students laughed out loud.  I based the words on things my students have said over the years, so I think they can relate. Of course there is a happy ending!

As a side note, I tried so hard to remove the 8th notes from Level One.  But since the words are the rhythm, I just couldn’t make it work. And frankly, this song is all about the words. I suggest if the 8th notes are bothersome in the Level One version, either teach the rhythm by rote or change the eighths to quarter notes.

Two Levels Are Included 

I thought several of my students at different levels  would enjoy this, so I wrote it in a Level One and an easy Level Two version. The versions are in different keys to fit the levels. I also wrote a teacher duet to go with the Level One version. But instead of writing a hard-to-read duet on one staff that even my parents with years of piano lessons have trouble with, I wrote it on two staves so that it is easy for parents or an older student with a few years of piano to play along.  Also included in an ink-saving cover which I put on the front page using the “fast” setting on my printer to save even more ink. I think a little art helps with artistry. Please note that the accompaniment (duet part) is for the Level One version only, but both versions are stand alone pieces that can be played solo at recitals.

This is a studio license, so a single teacher can make unlimited copies of each level. 

 

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Filed under Halloween, Holiday Music, Store

Practice Chart 2016

I have a few notices before I discuss today’s post. First, a gigantic thank you to my readers for supporting the website. Without your help I would not have been able to manage this blog for the last 10 years, especially now that it is so huge with such an extensive data base. I am about a year behind in writing thank you notes and I apologize for that.

The second notice is about my store. My website platform had a problem in their last update. If  you buy something in my store, I temporarily will have to personally email the file to you. I was told that the email problem will be fixed soon. In the meantime, I am enjoying emailing my music to you and getting your feedback!

If you purchased an item using PayPal and never received it, please let me know.

Practice Chart 2016

Practice Chart

Today’s post is an editable practice chart that matches my new 2016 design.  Be sure and reinforce the holes if you put it in a binder.

This PDF file is editable so you can choose the title. There is not a lot of room, so adjust your text to fit.  You can add your student’s name or type something like Practice Chart or Practice Log. You can also leave it blank. If you are new to editable PDF files, here are some instructions.

Directions

  • Open the PDF in the latest version of Adobe Reader. (This is the same free program you use to print all of my material.)
  • With your mouse, click about an inch down in the middle. (Use the image above to help find where the editable field is.)
  • A light blue text field box with a blinking cursor in the middle will show up where you should type. The blue box will not show up when printed!
  • Type your text in the box, adjusting your wording to fit.
  • I formatted the blue text fields to be centered so you will be starting in the center of the box.
  • Save the blank file so you can use it again with different text.

Can’t open the PDF files? Check out my frequently asked questions from the menu bar above.  Teachers have reported problems with the Windows 10 Edge browser and successfully use Chrome or Explorer instead.

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Note Rush for Your iPad, iPhone, and Android Devices

ipad_2

Photo used with permission

Lessons are starting back for many of us, and if you use a mobile device in your lessons or if you want to help your child at home, this is a great time to try out Note Rush. This app is on the Apple App Store and Google Play so you can use it with an iPhone, iPad, and many Android devices.

The developer of Note Rush made it to help students learn notes because his wife is a piano teacher. Students see the note on the staff and try to quickly play the note on the piano. The app listens to what is played  and can tell if the note is played correctly. I discovered a long time ago that students need to know not only the names of the notes, but where they are on the piano. What good does it do to know the name of the note if they can’t find it on their instrument? Note Rush is a great way to review notes for the One Minute Club.

You can use any instrument with this app because it detects the sound waves  of the instrument and can tell if the student plays the correct note.  You do not use cables or plugs. Just set the device on the music rack or hold it so the student can see it. Flash cards pop up on the screen and the students plays them. Note Rush will let the student know if the note is played incorrectly. It works with digital as well as acoustic instruments.

screenshot_3

Photo used with permission

When you open Note Rush, students have three different icons they can use for notes: soccer ball,  ladybug, or planet, with different backgrounds for each one. The teacher, student, or parent selects the appropriate level.  There are five levels to choose from:

  • Starter – the notes around middle C
  • Part Staff – bass C to treble C
  • Whole Staff – low F to high G
  • Just Ledgers – Ledger line notes
  • Grand Challenge – Low C to High C

In each of the above levels, you can select the notes to be either all treble, all bass, or both. That makes 15 different variations to choose from.

If you get frustrated with iPad apps that are not user-friendly, you will find Note Rush super simple to use and very fast to set up. With just a touch of your finger you easily change levels. There are no complicated menus to figure out.

My students were beta-testers for this app, so I have used it extensively with an iPad.  They enjoyed it and thought it was fun and helpful. It is very moderately priced for the work that was involved in making it. For my readers all over the globe, here is the price breakdown as of the time of this post:

AUD $5.99
USD $3.99
CAD $5.49
GBP £2.99

If you want to read more about it, visit the Note Rush website.

Please be aware that there are many Android devices and this app has not been tested on all of them.

[Disclosure: I was a beta-tester for Note Rush.  I received no compensation either as a tester or for this review. These are my personal opinions.]

 

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Filed under iPad Ideas, Note Identification