One Minute Club 2015

One Minute Club Pack2015

One Minute Club 2015

It’s time to post the 2015 One Minute Club Cards! This year’s set also includes two certificates, including one for the Junior One Minute Club. the junior cards are yellow.  There is also a handy chart where you can keep a record of their scores. Just remember to keep it lighthearted and fun!

Below is a video I made several years ago showing students of all ages giving it a try!

One Minute Club from Susan Paradis on Vimeo.

These cards are formatted for 2 x 3.5  perforated blank business cards. The borders in the cards extend past the cutting lines to aid in printer alignment problems. Make sure your PDF printer window is set to “actual size,” and you are using the latest version of Adobe Reader.

In case you don’t have any blank business cards,  I added short cutting lines for you to connect and then cut using regular card stock.

After students earn the cards,  I put them in clear plastic ID holders and attach them to their  book bag with a small chain. The next year all I have to do is insert the new card.

The last several years, I’ve increased the way I use this card with students who can identify note names, but are slow playing them.

  1. I use mini flash cards printed in different colors for the treble and bass clef.
  2.  First, I show the student the card and I identify it for the student, saying Bass C, Middle C, etc. and the student plays the key.
  3. Then the student has to identify the card the same way but this time he doesn’t play.
  4. Then we do just the space notes the regular way. When those are mastered we go on to line notes.
  5. I review steps 1 to 3 at every lesson.
  6. I have individual goals for each student who will be given the Junior Club Cards. But I want every child to be able to do at least the cards around middle C.

If you’re reading this and have no idea what the One Minute Club is, well, I’ve written about it extensively. For more information, use the search tab on the right, and type in One Minute Club or follow this link for last year’s post.

 

2 Comments

Filed under Certificates, Intermediate Students, Note Identification, Teaching Aids

The Berry Basket: The Story of a Rescued Piano Book

BerryBasket

One of the perks of having my own blog is that I can sit at my computer and ramble on about anything. Today, I’m going to tell you about a little out-of-print piano book I found on the internet.

I’m not sure what sent me to a site on Etsy that sold vintage ephemera, which is a fancy word for old printed collectables.  Somehow I found myself looking through a selection of used vintage piano books the shop was selling to cut up and use for crafts. How sad, I thought, that these old books, once lovingly handed to young children and toted back and forth to piano lessons with the hope that the children would fall in love with piano, are now reduced to being cut up for who knows what.

As I was looking and reminiscing, I came upon a 1953 piano book that looked so charming I had to take a close up look. It was named The Berry Basket, and it had the cutest vintage art on the cover. The seller had some pictures of the inside art (with no mention of the music), and I knew I had to get it.  The price was only $3.00 so I clicked the buy button. In a few days, there it was in the mail, saved from destruction and in the hands of someone who could appreciate it!

The book is written for beginners, and the first pieces are only 8 measures long, with sweet, vintage drawings on every page. Each little piece has simple, child-like lyrics.

I was happy to discover the music is in different 5-finger positions and keys. There are no C position pieces in the entire book!  The lyrics are very simple and childlike, back when young children were more innocent and didn’t know the questionable lyrics of today’s popular music.

Since this is a previously used book, there are markings from the teacher.

“Work out notes H.S. Don’t Guess.”  

“Count.”  

“Slow.” 

Some things never change in piano!

According to the preface, the music and words were written by the Sisters of the Holy Cross attending a music workshop in Salt Lake City, conducted by Bernice Frost, a well-known composer of piano teaching music last century.

I wonder what Bernice Frost said in her workshop that inspired the Sisters of the Holy Cross to compose this music? The preface says the book offers, “… development in the basic requirements of elementary musical training. Foremost among these are ear-training, singing, keyboard range and feel, essential points of technic, and pianistic style.”  Maybe Bernice Frost gave them ideas of all the many things that can be done at a piano lesson besides just playing the music. I like to think so.

Maybe the child who used this book is now a piano teacher in his or her golden years, with hundreds of former students who love piano music! I like to think that, too!

The Berry Basket Published by J. Fischer Bros

The Berry Basket
Published by J. Fischer Bros

 

21 Comments

Filed under Music Reviews, Teaching Business

Made for the iPad: More Rhythm Notes

 

I’m gradually trying to add more to my Made for the iPad page. To find this page, go to the top menu bar and select “Free”, then “Newer Free Resources,” then “iPad Resources,” and you will see a collection of materials I use on my iPad. This is also how you can get to my old site. Just select “Older Resources.”

Today I am posting four more rhythm pages to draw on a mobile tablet.  Check out this post for more notes, and go here for a tutorial of a free, easy app to draw on worksheets with several mobile devices. According to the developer, the app works on an iPad, Android tablet, Kindle Fire, and Windows tablet, which is pretty amazing. [Disclosure: I am not affiliated with this app in any way and I discovered it by accident a few year ago.]

My iPad page is a work in progress.  If you are successfully using any of my material on your tablet, please email me with some feedback. Pictures are great, too!

Subscribe to this blog, “like” my page on Facebook, or follow me on Pinterest to keep up with new material.

Let’s Draw Dotted Half Notes

Let’s Draw Eighth Notes

Lets Draw 16th Notes

Let’s Draw Upside Down Notes

5 Comments

Filed under iPad Ideas, Rhythm

Made for the iPad: Drawing Rhythm Notes

Made_For_iPad

In my last post, I showed you one way to use worksheets on your tablet device, such as an iPad, Kindle Fire, Android, or Windows tablet. Today I am giving you some pages to practice drawing notes on your tablet in a piano lesson. I will be posting more pages in this series, so check back. [Edited: Here is the link where I list all my iPad resources including dotted half notes, eighth notes, 16th notes, stem down notes, and more. I will also be adding rests very soon.]

Lets-Draw-Treble-Clef

Let’s Draw a Treble Clef

Lets-Draw-Bass-Clef

Lets Draw a Bass Clef

Lets-Draw-Whole-Notes

Lets Draw a Whole Note

Lets-Draw-HalfNote

Lets Draw a Half Note

Lets-Draw-QuarterNotes

 Lets Draw a Quarter Note

When I teach students how to draw notes, I like to start with the whole note and then show how to add lines to make it a half note. Fill in a half note and it becomes a quarter note. This way students see that every note has a note head the same size as a whole note. If I don’t do that, I usually have little teeny quarter and eighth notes and giant, bloated whole notes! I’ve also seen students waste time in ear training by, for example, erasing half notes, when all they need to do is fill in the half note to make it a quarter note.

One reason I like to make worksheets for a mobile device is because I can use lots of color and not worry about the cost of printing. That being said, teachers can print one of each, put into sheet protectors, and used with a dry erase pen. I do not recommend printing these for a student binder unless  you have a special student.

[For my UK & Down Under readers, I know you would like these with the correct rhythm terms, so I’ll be working on that as time permits. When I finish, I’ll add it to the UK page. For now, maybe you can just write over the North American terms.]

5 Comments

Filed under iPad Ideas, Rhythm