Category Archives: Group lesson ideas

Jingle Bells Duet with Rhythm Instruments

Christmas Rhythm Instruments

Jingle Bells Duet With Rhythm Instruments

 

Does anyone remember this arrangement I made for my students a few years ago? There is an early intermediate piano part, an easy one hand duet, and parts for 4 rhythm instruments.

What is new in this PDF is that I added individual scores for the rhythm instruments. I received many requests for that and I’m finally getting around to it! All the pages are combined into one PDF and you can print what you need.

If you are having group lessons this week or next, there is still time to print this out for your students. The rhythm instrument parts are for beginners and no practice is necessary.

The piano part also stands alone as a piano solo without the duet or the rhythm instruments. Or you can use the piano part out of a Christmas book.

The easy duet part can also be played on an electric bass, a keyboard, melody bells or any other tuned instrument that sounds good with your piano.

What I like about this arrangement is that there is something for everyone, so if you happen to have group lessons with all levels, every student will have something to do.

I also thought this would be fun for a musical family to play when they get together for the holidays. If you don’t have any rhythm instruments, improvise with whatever you have around the house! Here is a set of rhythm instruments from my Amazon affiliate site that has free shipping now.  I use my set of rhythm instruments frequently in my teaching, but especially around the Christmas holidays!

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Filed under Christmas, Group lesson ideas, Holiday Music

Bats and Cats Rhythm Game

BatsAndCatsRhythm

Bats and Cats Rhythm Game

If you have a group lesson coming up or you are looking for a Halloween game, here is one I posted a few years ago. I’m reposting it today in case you have forgotten about it.  A lot of teachers think this game is just for beginners because the game board has only easy note values. But there are 3 sets of cards for this game, and each set gets progressively more difficult. The third set has 16th notes beamed with 8th notes which is in the 4th level books of most modern method books.

Print out just the levels you want to use. The first page has directions to the game, so there is no need to print that page on card stock. This game looks really lovely printed on photo paper, which I buy at Dollar Tree. At 8 pages for $1.00, it is very reasonable and really makes the color pop out. I also laminate the game board. Be sure to print out more than one page of the rhythm cards if you use this with a group.

[Last year I made a companion to this game, but for notes instead of rhythm.  Students enjoy it, too, and I also made keyboard cards for beginners to use with it. You can find the note game here.]

Bats And Cats Notes

Directions to Bats and Cats Rhythm Game

  • Print two game boards, one for the student and one for the teacher. If playing with a group, print one game board for each student.
  • Print out the bat rhythm cards on cards stock and cut them into squares. If playing with a group, print more cards. Using your printer’s settings, print the cards with the rhythms that are appropriate for your student and omit the rhythms the student has not learned.
  • Divide the cards equally among the players or use a common stack for the cards, depending on how many cards you use.
  • Players take turns drawing a card, counting the rhythm, and placing it over a corresponding rhythm on the game board. If a player draws a card with the corresponding rhythm already covered, place it in a discard pile to be shuffled and used again.
  • The game is over when the first player covers all 9 squares.

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Filed under Group lesson ideas, Halloween, Holiday Activities and Worksheets, Rhythm

Composer Memory Game

Composer Memory Game

Composer Memory Game

Would you like your students to learn a little bit about famous composers, but you don’t have a lot of lesson time? I’ve made a set of composers you can cut out and glue on the inside of a milk caps. I used card stock and Elmer’s ‘Extreme School Glue Stick’.

If you don’t have a set of caps available, ask your piano parents to collect them for you. My students really enjoyed bringing the caps to me. I have enough now to last as long as I teach piano!

If you don’t have caps, the printable is made with a cutting grid, so you can cut out the composers as small cards. However, my students really liked the milk caps and thought they were a lot of fun, so I encourage you to make them that way.

I had a hard time deciding which composers to include. If I’ve left off your favorite classical composer, leave a comment and when I get enough suggestions, I’ll make a second set!  Stick to the old composers because the portraits of modern composers are protected by copyright, although I can use just their name and not a picture.

An important part of the game is for students to say the composer’s name as they turn over the cap to help them learn the correct pronunciation. After a while, they will be saying Tchaikovsky and Chopin like a pro!

This printable is for private use only. You are welcome to print this and use it with your students. Please read the first page and follow the terms of use included in the PDF.

Objective

  • To become familiar with the names of the great classical composers.
  • To learn how to pronounce their names.
  • To reinforce visual recognition skills.

 Ages

  • All ages of students.

 Number of Players

  • Two or more players. The teacher can play with a student, or students can play in groups.

Materials

  • Sixteen plastic beverage caps (lids) the size of milk jugs.
  • The PDF printable included in this post.
  • Scissors and glue stick to construct the playing pieces.
  • If caps are not available, the cards can be cut out and used.

Directions

  • Print and cut out the pictures of the composers, cutting them in small circles that fit the inside of the lids.
  • Glue the composer pictures on the inside of the plastic caps.
  • Place the caps on a table, face down, with four rows and four columns and the composer face not visible.
  • Players take turns selecting two caps and turning them to the picture side to see if they match.
  • Students say the names of the composers as they turn the caps.
  • If the two caps are the same, the player gets to keep them. If not, they return the caps to the same spot, face down again.
  • Play continues until all the caps are matched.

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Filed under Games, Group lesson ideas

Fifteen Keys – A Key Signature Game

Fifteen Keys

 Fifteen Keys

In our state theory test, students in the 6th grade need to know all of the major key signatures.  Minor keys are added in the 7th grade.  Like many teachers, I show them how to use a chart to help with accuracy and possible careless mistakes.

This year I made a board game to give students some guided practice in using a chart and learning key signatures. First we downloaded a blank chart and filled it out. You can get it below.

Key-Signature-Chart-Blank

Blank Key Signature Chart

I encourage you to use this chart with the game, too, unless your students are very experienced in key signatures. One good thing about this game is that by using the chart, even beginning students can play.

I had fun making the cards for this game.  Some of the cards have silly riddles and puns on the word “key.”  I hope your students enjoy the humor. I thought of more riddles after I made the cards, and if you think of any, let me know!  The answers to the riddles are here.*

This game is similar to the Nine Keys Game that I posted a few years ago, except that this one has all new cards,  and the Nine Keys Game only has, well, 9 key signatures, rather than 15! Nine Keys

There are 7 pages in this PDF. The last page is an optional back to the cards. You will need to print the cards separately because I formatted the cards  for a business card template, such as this one on Amazon. First, I printed just the game board on card stock. Then I inserted the business card stock and printed the cards. Finally, I reinserted the cards and printed the backs. If you don’t have business card stock, connect the short lines and cut them out. But I am so happy to use the business cards! [I also found the business card stock at Sam’s for less.]

I’ve played this two ways. The longer version has the tokens moving all over the game board, backwards and forwards, which makes it fun, but takes a little longer to finish.

Ages

  • This game is for middle school students, but I’ve successfully played it with younger students.
  •  Remove the minor key cards from the deck to play with students who are learning only major keys.
  • The game is also good for group lessons or music camps.
  • It helps if students have a basic understanding of key signatures, but it is not a requirement if they use the chart.

Material

  • Fifteen Keys, the free printable game board from my website.
  • Key signature chart, or Circle of Fifths chart
  • The cards, cut or separated.
  • A small game token for each player.
  • If you don’t know how to print individual pages of a PDF, go here and scroll down.

Directions

Fast version

  • Place the key signature chart in full view.
  • Players take turns drawing a game card. Depending on the card, they either move forward to the key on the card, or answer the question and follow the directions. Students can look at the chart to find the names of the key signatures.
  • If they draw a key signature that is not located past their token, they do not move to a key they have already passed, but draw again.
  • The game is over when a player lands on or moves past “win.”

Slower version

  • Place the key signature chart in full view.
  • Players take turns drawing a game card. Depending on the card, they either move forward to the key on the card, or answer the question and follow the directions. Students can look at the chart to find the names of the key signatures.
  • If it is a key signature card, the player moves to the closest key signature specified on the card, even it they have to move backwards to a key they have already passed by.
  • The game is over when a player draws the exact number to land on “win” or when a player moves past “win.”

Objectives

  • To learn to quickly identify all the major and/or minor key signatures.
  • To learn how to draw and use a key signature chart.

This game works on identifying key signatures. However, I have also made some worksheets for writing key signatures. If your students have trouble learning how to draw key signatures on a staff for written tests or composing, these are a lot of help!

Simple Sharps

Fearless Flats

Down a 5th, Up a Fourth

Up a 4th, Down a Fifth

The Noteboys Circle of Fifths Poster

*Riddles:

  • 3 things that need a key: House, car, scale, door, music, etc. 
  • What barnyard bird can open doors: Tur”key”.  (or Turn”key”)
  • Key signature’s favorite dance: Ho”key” Po”key”
  • What jungle animal loves key signatures? Mon”key”
  • What barnyard animal sings off key? Don”key”
  • When you are slow you may be called: Pokey
  • What kind of key can you type on: Keyboard
  • Another name for the tonic is: the Keynote

 

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Filed under Games, Group lesson ideas, Music Printables, Texas State Theory Test