Category Archives: Holiday Activities and Worksheets

Autumn and Halloween Activities

Click on each one for the link or find all Autumn and Halloween material including future updates  here.  

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New! Scarecrow Stomp Game

scarecrowstomp

Scarecrow Stomp Game

What do musical little scarecrows do when they get tired of chasing away crows? Well they stomp the acorn notes scattered over the field, or course! Well, at least in my imagination that’s what they do. This is a yet another version of my favorite game, and of course I made new cards, this time with an autumn theme. It’s kind of nostalgic, because I doubt few kids in the suburbs know what it’s like to bale hay. I have a lot of readers who DO live on a farm, plus a lot who have all these memories in their head. I know I do, and there is nothing like autumn on the farm. [Edited to fix the keyboard cards. There is now a B! You will need to refresh your screen for the updated version.]

The nice thing about fall activities is they can be used all the way through Thanksgiving. This is a good game for students who don’t celebrate Halloween. There is no Card of Doom, but there is a terrible card. Literally, it’s The Terrible Card!

The original file contains 7 pages:

  • The board game
  • The optional colorful back
  • Three pages of flash cards
  • Fun directional cards, including The Terrible Card

How to Print

  • Set your printer to landscape. For a crisp, good-looking game board, use photo paper and laminate.
  • Insert photo paper or card stock and print the game board. When the print box opens up, under “Pages to Print” select “Pages.” In the dialog box, type “1” because you are only printing the first page. Set it aside to dry.
  • Insert card stock to print the cards. Under “Pages to Print” select “Pages” again and type “2-6.” If you can only print one page of card stock at a time, type a different number for each page.
  • To print the back of the flash cards, re-insert the printed card pages so that you will be printing on the back. Under “Pages to Print” select “Pages” and type “7” because the 7th page is the colorful back. [To keep from wasting ink, be sure you know how to do this. See my FAQ.]
  • You may have this printed at a print shop. I can send you a release if you need it.

Directions

This game can be played with students only, or teacher and student. The players take turns drawing cards and moving to the correct alphabet name. Mix up the note cards with the instruction cards.  The game is over when a player draws any note card after the last D. I try to make sure the students win more than they lose, so sometimes I have to get creative! You can mix and match the cards to fit the students. If a student only knows a few notes on the staff, add the keyboard cards to extend the game. For pre-school children, help them say the music alphabet backwards by letting them read it backwards or omit this card if necessary.

Objectives

  • To reinforce or learn note names on the staff
  • To learn the word “octave.”

This file is for personal use in your home or piano studio. Please do not share electronic files. My material is copyrighted. Do not post images on your website. Thanks!

 

 

 

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Filed under Games, Group lesson ideas, Holiday Activities and Worksheets, Preschool Music Resources

Mother’s Day Beginning Composing

MothersDay

Mothers Day Composing Activity

Originally posted in 2008, I’ve revised the art and words, and put both the pre-reading and on-the-staff versions in the same file.  They use less ink, too. Print only the version you want and save paper!

If you have trouble printing these, please save them to your desk top or in any file and the file. If you subscribe to this blog, don’t try to print  from the email that you receive from WordPress. Also, if you have upgraded to Windows 10, you might not be able to open my files unless you make some changes. Check out my FAQ for more help.

Some students take meticulous care in writing their melody. Others dash it off as just one more thing they have to hurry through! Some like to add words and others want to change my rhythm all around. It’s interesting to watch their reaction and it’s fine with me! My rule is that it has to end on the tonic to work with my melody.

If you’ve never seen this kind of composing sheet, here is a quick tutorial.

Pre-reading

  • Use any 5-finger position.
  • Sing the first 8 measures.
  • Clap and count the rhythm of the last 8 measures until they know it well.
  • Students write in the finger numbers they want to use inside the flower pictures. Be sure to use pencil! A good composer is always revising!
  • Optional: Laminate and add a bow as a Mother’s Day present!

On-the-staff

  • Follow the same directions as above, except students write their melody on the staff.
  • Students who are more advanced like to write in chords or notes in the l.h. and melody in the right.
  • Beginning students limit their melody to the right hand in C position.
  • Explain a good sounding melody often will end on the 5th note of the scale in measure 12 and the tonic key note in the last measure. This is a great opportunity to discuss how to write a good melody.

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Filed under Composing Activities, Holiday Activities and Worksheets, Music Printables, Preschool Music Resources

Steal A Heart – A Valentine Game Revised

StealaHeart

Steal A Heart Game

I created this game about five years ago for a group class I had near Valentine’s Day. It was an older group with middle school and high school age students. I told them it was a game to test them on the dreaded ledger line notes! But I also included all the notes so I could use it with more students.

They had a lot of fun playing it, stealing the same cards back and forth and trying to figure out the really hard ledger lines. They laughed a lot and I was glad that I had a game this group enjoyed.

There were really only two problems with this game in the original form:

  • It used a whole lot of red ink.
  • I could never remember the rules!

With that in mind and with Valentine’s coming up, I remade it. I cut the amount of red ink by about 80%. If  you don’t want to use all the difficult ledger line cards, you don’t have to print them because they are on a separate page. And the game directions are included in the PDF file, so you can print them and keep it with the game.

I hope these revisions will encourage more teachers to try it. It works well with any age student and it is lots of fun.

It can also be modified for use in a private lesson.

Objective

  • To review the names of notes on the grand staff.
  • To learn identify ledger line notes in the bass and treble staves.

Materials

  • Print a game board for each player.
  • Print and cut the small note cards along the dotted lines.

Directions

  • Place a stack of the little heart cards face down in reach of everyone.
  • The first player draws a  card, names the note, and places the card on an empty heart on his/her game board.
  • Give students time to figure out the note.
  • If a student draws a “Steal a Heart” card, he may take a heart card from the game board of the person on his right, but he must name the note he is stealing.
  • If he draws a “Be Mine” card, he puts it over a card he has already placed on his board to protect it, and then draws another card. The other players cannot steal a card that is “protected”  with the “Be Mine” card.
  • If the player draws a “Give my Heart” card, he gives one of his cards to the player on his right, who must name the card before he can accept it.
  • Feel free to modify the rules or change the way the game is played.

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Filed under Games, Group lesson ideas, Holiday Activities and Worksheets, Intermediate Students, Valentine's Day