Category Archives: Intermediate Students

Triad Trios – Identify Triads Inversions with Roman Numerals

Triad Trios

Triad Trios

Every time my intermediate students learn how to identify triads with Roman numerals, I remind myself that I need to make a fast activity that will make this easier and more fun. With the help of my students who tested it and made suggestions, I finally came up with this one which we named Triad Trios, because it only takes 3 cards in a column to win. It is a fast game for student and teacher.

Since this is an introductory activity, the key signature is C Major. I successfully used this with students who had no experience with the concept and they learned it much faster than when I simply explained it to a student with a worksheet.

I am a little hesitant about posting it here, however. Triad Trios is an easy game to explain in person, but I found it difficult to write the instructions. I’ve made some graphics that I hope will help. I suggest you print the instructions and save the with the cards.

I found this game to be fantastic in teaching a very hard concept and making it easy to learn. Teachers who prepare students for exams such as your state theory exam or ABRSM, as well as the AP music exam will find Triad Trios very helpful.

Objective

  • On the grand staff in the key of C major, identify I, IV, and V triads with the correct Roman numeral.
  • Use the correct Arabic numeral for inverted triads, using the bass note as the identifier.

Cards

  • Triad Trios uses only 9 cards per player, and is printed on front and back. You will make two sets, one for each player, using a different color for each set.
  • The file has 2 pages, but the second page is for the back of the cards.
  • Print only one page, then print on the back however your printer does that.
  • Alternately, instead of printing the second page on the back, which can be tricky, you can hand write the Roman numerals  on the back.
  • The purpose of the colored card stock is to quickly separate the decks. If you only have white card stock, mark them in some way.

Directions

  • This activity is for two players: student and teacher, or two students.
  • Each player has a deck of one color of cards. The “front” of the card show a triad on the staff. The back has the Roman numeral answer.
  • Each player has his deck on a table in front of him with the front of the cards (the grand staff side) facing up.
  • Before starting, explain that all the cards are in the key of C Major. Review the I, IV, and V chords in C.
  • Without turning the card over to see the back, the first player identifies the top card in his stack, saying, for example, I6 (one six). The player turns the card over to see the answer. Then he places it on the table with the answer (the back of the card) facing up.
  • The second player repeats this, and puts his card on the table also.
  • The play continues in this fashion. Every time a card is drawn it is placed on the table. The cards should be arranged in columns, so that all the Roman numeral I cards are in the first column, all the Roman IV cards are in the second column, and all the Roman numeral V cards are in the third column.
  • The first player who has all three inversions (I, I6, and I6/4 or IV, IV6, and IV6/4 OR V, V6 and V6/4) in a column is the winner.
  • Since I use this game as a teaching tool, there is no penalty if they get the answer wrong. I simply help them figure it out.

 

 

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Filed under Intermediate Students, Texas State Theory Test, Theory

2017 One Minute Club Cards

One Minute Club 2017

One_Minute_Club_2017

I’ve finished the 2017 One Minute Club cards. In the file there is also a chart to keep track of your students’ times, and a certificate that a lot of teachers request.

If you are not sure how to use this activity works, the idea is you show students flash cards and they “say and play” the notes on the grand staff in one minute or less.

Playing the correct key on the piano is important, because as you know, students can learn notes on flash cards and remain clueless when it comes to knowing the correct placement on the piano. This solves that problem.

However, we have to prepare students to learn how to do this. We can’t just present the cards one day and hope for the best. My students have been studying notes all year, and this is the culmination of all that work.

Also, you have to keep it light-hearted and fun. That is why this activity is better with older students who have developed fine motor skills and already have a good grasp of note names.

For students who struggle to learn note names, it’s better to wait until they are older, and then to gradually work up to this. I usually start with 2 flash cards. After they can do that, I start gradually adding more, but never so many that they are overwhelmed. They may need to wait a few years before they actually do the entire grand staff. However, I also included “Junior One Minute Club” cards if you want to reward your students who can’t manage to say and play them in a minute.

Here is a link to a video I made to show you how it works.

The cards, chart, and certificate are in the same PDF file. You will need to know how to print individual pages in a PDF. I print only the chart first to keep a record of students’ times. Later, you can print the number of cards and certificates you need.

There are 10 cards on the first page. It is formatted for “business card” perforated cardstock, but you can also cut them out. I put them in plastic business card holders and attach them to their music bags.

You might notice the design is the same orange-colored theme I used for the calendar at the beginning of the year. My students look forward to new art each year.

You can read more about how to run this activity on my blog at this link. One Minute Club

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Filed under Certificates, Intermediate Students, Note Identification

Valentine Activities

It’s not too late to play a Valentine music game or play some Valentine music.  All of the material in this post are listed here on my page of free Valentine activities.

If you have middle or high school group lessons or a Valentine’s Day party, try this really fun Valentine game, Steal A Heart. I remade it a few years ago so that it is ink friendly. My teens love this game. Ledger line notes are included, but you don’t have to use them.

Valentine Board Game

Valentine Card Rhythm Hunt is a fast game you can play with beginners who are learning rhythm. I’ve made this game for every holiday, so if you don’t get to play it now, check out the other versions.

Valentine Card Rhythm Hunt

There is a 4 page (folded) Valentine’s card with a note story and a sudoku rhythm game. This makes a nice card to give students the week of February 14.

If you want to see more Valentine music activities, check out my Valentine page! There are links to some Valentine music, too.

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Filed under Games, Group lesson ideas, Intermediate Students, Valentine's Day

Rhythm Review 1-6 Revised

Rhythm Review Levels 1-3

Rhythm Review 1-3

Rhythm Review Levels 4-6

Rhythm Review Levels 4-6

I’ve mentioned before that a lot of the theory worksheets I post are for the Texas MTA theory exams. These exams are in twelve levels, one for each grade. The early grades are not hard and they are a great way for teachers to discover if their students are really remembering all the theory we teach in lessons. If you are in an area that offers theory exams, consider them!

Last year, after several years of hard work, the TMTA theory tests were revised. In my studio, that means I need to revise all my theory worksheets. It is a daunting challenge, but I’ve been slowly trying.

Today’s post contains rhythm questions for grades one through six and up to about level 4 in most method books. In the top left corner of each page, I numbered the tests with the TMTA level to keep them straight, but teachers can certainly use these sheets to reinforce rhythm concepts at any grade. You all know I love silly cartoons, but I tried really hard to make these pages friendly looking, and not cartoony. They use less ink than the originals, and they can be used with any age.

See any mistakes? Let me know!

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Filed under Intermediate Students, Rhythm, Texas State Theory Test, Theory, Worksheets