Category Archives: Note Identification

2017 One Minute Club Cards

One Minute Club 2017

One_Minute_Club_2017

I’ve finished the 2017 One Minute Club cards. In the file there is also a chart to keep track of your students’ times, and a certificate that a lot of teachers request.

If you are not sure how to use this activity works, the idea is you show students flash cards and they “say and play” the notes on the grand staff in one minute or less.

Playing the correct key on the piano is important, because as you know, students can learn notes on flash cards and remain clueless when it comes to knowing the correct placement on the piano. This solves that problem.

However, we have to prepare students to learn how to do this. We can’t just present the cards one day and hope for the best. My students have been studying notes all year, and this is the culmination of all that work.

Also, you have to keep it light-hearted and fun. That is why this activity is better with older students who have developed fine motor skills and already have a good grasp of note names.

For students who struggle to learn note names, it’s better to wait until they are older, and then to gradually work up to this. I usually start with 2 flash cards. After they can do that, I start gradually adding more, but never so many that they are overwhelmed. They may need to wait a few years before they actually do the entire grand staff. However, I also included “Junior One Minute Club” cards if you want to reward your students who can’t manage to say and play them in a minute.

Here is a link to a video I made to show you how it works.

The cards, chart, and certificate are in the same PDF file. You will need to know how to print individual pages in a PDF. I print only the chart first to keep a record of students’ times. Later, you can print the number of cards and certificates you need.

There are 10 cards on the first page. It is formatted for “business card” perforated cardstock, but you can also cut them out. I put them in plastic business card holders and attach them to their music bags.

You might notice the design is the same orange-colored theme I used for the calendar at the beginning of the year. My students look forward to new art each year.

You can read more about how to run this activity on my blog at this link. One Minute Club

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Filed under Certificates, Intermediate Students, Note Identification

Big One Staff Flash Cards

Big Flash Cards

Big One Staff Flash Cards

I’ve thought I’d take some time to let you know how the updating of my teaching resources is going here on Piano Teaching Resources. 

First of all, it’s a big undertaking to re-do and repost more than 10 years worth of printables, and I’ve been working on it for three years. I do it in my spare time and I feel like I have finally made some progress. I’ve finished the most of the holiday games and worksheets. I’ve finished all the other games and worksheets, and that took forever! I’ve posted so many big files.

The printables I’ve finished can be found by selecting “Free” at the top of the page and then following the links. Right now I’m working on “Teaching Aids” which includes certificates, flash cards, and anything that is not a worksheet, a game, or music. The last thing I do will be the music section.

Back when I first started posting, I was not able to rotate PDF’s to portrait orientation or to combine pages into one PDF. That is one of the things I fix when I go back and re-do material.

It’s been very helpful for me, in a way, to re-do my material. Some of it was made for a specific student, but then I forgot all about it. Going though and re-working material has helped me re-connect. In the beginning I made all the graphics in programs that were not very flexible. For, example, the flash cards I’m posting today were originally made in Word for Windows 95. That was when some of my readers were babies! I updated them in programs better suited for graphics.

I am posting these cards because they are useful for younger students. The lines are big enough for students to count, but not so big that they take up a lot of space. They have some features that make them easy for teachers to use:

  • Black and while
  • Big fat lines that are easy for students to count
  • Four cards to a page
  • Only two cutting lines so there are no margins to cut off
  • Big enough to play games

Thank you for your feedback and comments and I’m so happy that my material is helping piano students around the world!

 

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Filed under Note Identification, Teaching Aids

Write the Grand Staff from G to F

Write the Grand Staff from G to F

The Grand Staff from G to F

In this worksheet, students write the name of the note inside each note. You can also have them draw lines to the corresponding piano keys if you have time. It can even be inserted into their binder as a handy guide.

Typically, piano students are taught the notes on the treble staff and the bass staff. But many times students don’t realize the logical continuity of the grand staff. We know the grand staff is more than two separate entities, one for right hand and one for left. However, there is just so much to teach in so little time that it is easy to have short cuts to learning concepts in order to get everything covered. If you have ever had students who need to see the overall picture of the grand staff, this little work sheet might help. It shows clearly how the music alphabet continues from bass to treble staff.

Elizabeth Gutierrez suggests using A C E to learn the grand staff.  My students find A C E easier than some other ways. It also helps them to learn the inner ledger lines. So I have students circle all the ACE’s on the grand staff. There is no reason you can’t use guide notes, A C E or FACE, or Every Good Boy Does Fine, or whatever you find successful with a particular student.

Learning note names will not necessarily make students good sight readers. Different parts of the brain are used to identify notes than to actually sight-read notes at the piano. However, learning notes will help our students become overall better musicians. Learning note names can be difficult for some students, but we have to keep trying!

Here is a little tidbit for your students. The phrase GRAND STAFF starts with G and ends with F. How is that for a coincidence!

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Filed under Note Identification

Let’s Play Ball Worksheets

Lets Play Ball Worksheet

Lets Play Ball Worksheets

I made the Let’s Play Ball worksheet a few years ago for a student who loved baseball. The original one I posted was for piano keys only, and while I actually tried to make a staff version at the same time, I found it almost finished, abandoned and forgotten in my computer files. I finished it up because I have a student who just tried out and made a new baseball team and I thought he would enjoy this way of reinforcing note names. The instructions are to draw lines to connect the notes or keys to the alphabet letters.

These worksheets use some ink, which is why I like to use my iPad for handout like this. They both work really well on an iPad because all the student has to do is draw lines to connect the alphabet letter to the note on the staff or the piano key. Another ink saver is to make one copy and put it in a sheet protector and then use dry or wet eraser markers. I like the sheet protector idea because they are easy to store in binder.

I want to mention to my long-time followers that I have been trying to get all my material listed in a way to make it easier to find.

If you select the Free tab at the top a new page will open.  Click on Newer Free Resources and scroll down to select the type of items you want.

I have finished moving all my old games to the “Game” page. There might be some floating around somewhere that I’m trying to find and add. Most of the holiday pages, except for holiday sheet music, is finished so you should be able to see almost all of the Valentine and St. Patrick’s day material.

 Now I’m working on the “Worksheet” page and I think it will take me a long time. Eventually I hope to get all the music and teaching aids from the old site moved over. If you find a broken link, please let me know so I can fix it.

When a site has as much material as this one, it can be hard to find things. What I do is a Google search such as: Susan Paradis fly flash cards. Google seems to do a better job than the search engine on my blog! I also have a Pinterest page where there are boards for all my material.

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Filed under Note Identification, Worksheets