Category Archives: Preschool Music Resources

LadyBug Game Revised

LadyBugGame

Lady Bug Game Board

LadyBug Game Cards

This is one of my favorite games. It’s fast and fun and I think it’s a good game to play this time of year. I’ve revised it and remade the keyboard cards.

Game Board

  • I suggest printing the colorful game board on photo paper and then laminating it so the colors really come to life. It can also be taken to an office shop. MTNA members, use Office Depot/Max and receive a big discount.

Cards

  • Before you print the cards, decide which pages you want to use. Please don’t print all the pages at once because the last page is the optional backs.
  • Print on card stock. They do not have to be laminated.
  • There are 5 pages of cards.
  • Pages 1-3 are notes on the staff.
  • Page 4 has keyboard cards.
  • Page 5 is the optional back of the cards. After printing the cards on pages 1-4,  insert the pages back into your printer to print the back of the cards. Please see my FAQ for a tutorial on how to do this.

Directions

  • This game can be played with students or teacher and student.
  • Each player has a token.
  • The cards are placed face down next to the game board.
  • The first player draws a card and moves their token forward along the path to the closest letter that matches the note on their card.
  • The next player draws and moves in the same way.
  • The game is over when someone draws a card that takes them to the last G or any note after the last G at the end of the path.
  • There are many games you can play with this game board.  Use your own ideas and I hope you have fun!

Objectives

  • To learn the music alphabet.
  • To learn to recognize notes on the grand staff or keys on a piano keyboard.
  • To reinforce learning steps and skips.

Ages

  • Early childhood and elementary ages.

Why I like this game

  • It’s fast, under 3 minutes, students always like it.
  • Children learn faster if they are having fun.
  • It’s a great game for beginners to learn piano key names.
  • The game is so fast, you can play more than once.

 

2 Comments

Filed under Games, Group lesson ideas, Music Printables, Note Identification, Preschool Music Resources

Mother’s Day Beginning Composing

MothersDay

Mothers Day Composing Activity

Originally posted in 2008, I’ve revised the art and words, and put both the pre-reading and on-the-staff versions in the same file.  They use less ink, too. Print only the version you want and save paper!

If you have trouble printing these, please save them to your desk top or in any file and the file. If you subscribe to this blog, don’t try to print  from the email that you receive from WordPress. Also, if you have upgraded to Windows 10, you might not be able to open my files unless you make some changes. Check out my FAQ for more help.

Some students take meticulous care in writing their melody. Others dash it off as just one more thing they have to hurry through! Some like to add words and others want to change my rhythm all around. It’s interesting to watch their reaction and it’s fine with me! My rule is that it has to end on the tonic to work with my melody.

If you’ve never seen this kind of composing sheet, here is a quick tutorial.

Pre-reading

  • Use any 5-finger position.
  • Sing the first 8 measures.
  • Clap and count the rhythm of the last 8 measures until they know it well.
  • Students write in the finger numbers they want to use inside the flower pictures. Be sure to use pencil! A good composer is always revising!
  • Optional: Laminate and add a bow as a Mother’s Day present!

On-the-staff

  • Follow the same directions as above, except students write their melody on the staff.
  • Students who are more advanced like to write in chords or notes in the l.h. and melody in the right.
  • Beginning students limit their melody to the right hand in C position.
  • Explain a good sounding melody often will end on the 5th note of the scale in measure 12 and the tonic key note in the last measure. This is a great opportunity to discuss how to write a good melody.

3 Comments

Filed under Composing Activities, Holiday Activities and Worksheets, Music Printables, Preschool Music Resources

St. Patrick’s Day Beginning Composing

 

St Patrick's Day Composing

St Patrick’s Day Composing

In my never-ending quest to change everything on my website to portrait orientation, I have updated these two St. Patrick’s Day composing pages and put them together into one PDF file. It’s time-consuming, which is why it is taking me so long!

The first page is for composing on the staff.  I wrote a little poem and put the rhythm above the staff. The student can write a melody with bass notes, or just the melody.

The pre-reading page has the rhythm written above shamrocks, and they write the finger numbers of their melody on the shamrocks.

I always suggest to my students  to start and end on the same note if they want a singable melody and I suggest D using only white keys for an Irish sounding melody.  It is always amazing to me that some students have an innate ability to come up with a good melody! Other students write notes willy-nilly here and there and it sounds rather like me composing 12-tone music for a theory class. 🙂

Some students want to compose melody and accompaniment, so I suggest they start with fifths in the left hand and use D minor and C parallel fifths. If they get carried away and want to expand their composition, check out the staff paper I’ve posted that has a braced grand staff, measures, and bar lines. It’s one of the pages in this bundle.  Staff Paper Variety Pack

Staff Paper Variety Pack

If you don’t know how to print only one page in a PDF bundle, there is a tutorial in my FAQ.

5 Comments

Filed under Composing Activities, Preschool Music Resources, St. Patrick's Day

Animal Alphabet Songs

AnimalAlphabetSongs

7 Alphabet Animal Songs

I tried to make it easy for everyone by creating one PDF document for all 7 of these songs. But for some reason, no matter how I tried, the links were not correct. So I am starting all over with new links. If this doesn’t work, I will have to come up with another cunning plan. 🙂

You have permission to use these with your students. They may not be sold, the files may not be shared, and they may not be posted on other websites. You are welcome to share a link back to this page. Hot linking the PDF is not allowed. The music, lyrics, and art are my original creations.

When I first published these songs in 2013, each one was a separate blog post. I discussed the creative process in writing them and how very, very difficult it is writing a song with just one or two notes. That is why I composed duets for each one.  They make the music a lot more interesting for student and teacher.

I think students do better at reading in the long run if they learn from the very beginning that middle C is not always going to be a thumb. I know not everyone agrees with this, so please feel free to put whatever finger numbers suit your fancy. In some of the songs, I left the fingering off so that you can do just that.

These pieces are supposed to be like nursery rhymes. The lyrics help with the rhythm and make the songs more fun. Please encourage your students to sing or at least chant along!

Below are links (hopefully!) t0 the original blog posts for each individual song. I had so much fun writing these songs and using them with my youngest students. That is why I enjoy sharing them with you. Do your students have a favorite? I would love to know which one! Even better, I would love to see a video of your student singing and playing!

Alligator, Alligator, All You Play is A

B is for the Baseball Bear

Pat the Cat’s Patting Song

E is for Elephant

The Doughnut Mystery: It’s D Day

Frogs Wearing Flip Flops

G Is For Giraffe

 

 

 

 

 

7 Comments

Filed under Elementary Music, Note Identification, Preschool Music Resources