Category Archives: Rhythm

Crotchets, Quavers, and Minims…Oh, My! Worksheets With UK Vocabulary

UK WorksheetsPP-2

[Ed. I will use this post to list all past and future material with British terminology, as well as the material in the graphic above.]

Sometimes I forget that not every English-speaking person uses the same music vocabulary. Thanks to some help from a British teacher, here are some of my rhythm worksheets that I have re-made using crotchets, minims, quavers, and semibreves.  I also changed measure to bar, staff to stave, and the spelling of yogurt. I hope I haven’t made any mistakes because a lot of this was new to me!

When you open a file, you do not have to print each page. Print only what you need. Check out my FAQ if you do not know how to do this.

UK Rhythm Worksheets is a colorful set of 5 beginning level worksheets.

UK Memory Games  is a set of matching games. There are two games in this file, both for beginners. One features rhythm values and the other has basic vocabulary words. Cut them out and place the cards face down. Students (or student and teacher) take turns turning 2 cards up, trying to find a match. You can read more about how to play these games on my website, such as this page.

UK Rhythm Review is a set of 6 levels of rhythm worksheets. This is a good way to find out how much transfer students know or use as a review.

UK Grand Staves is a set of color and black and white grand staves. Two have the notes written in, and two are blank so students can write in the notes.

UK Rhythm Round About Game Cards go with the Rhythm Round About Game. This is a GREAT game to teach rhythm vocabulary. It’s very colorful and uses lots of ink, but beginning students love it.

I included the UK in the name of the files so it would help you distinguish which ones are new. I hope all my friends from around the world who use these terms will find these printables useful.

Now I really wish I had a pot of tea and some scones with clotted cream and jam!

 

 

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Filed under Group lesson ideas, Rhythm, Theory

Individual Rhythm Flash Cards

Rhythm Flash Cards

Rhythm Flash Cards

These rhythm flash cards are about the size of a deck of playing cards. They are small enough for students to hold in their hands to play card games. A variety of levels are included, from beginning to late intermediate, whole notes to dotted eighths and sixteenths.

There are 6 pages of flash cards in this printable. The last page is a colorful graphic designed for the back of the cards so they are more fun. You can print only the pages of the cards you need. You will have to reinsert the graphic for the back of the cards into your printer. If you are not sure how to do this, look at the FAQ on this blog. Scroll down until you see “How to Print On Both Sides of Flash Cards.”

To keep the pattern for the back of the cards lined up evenly and to look nice, I didn’t make a cutting line all the way across the page. Instead, there is a thin white line to cut on.

If you are not going to print the colorful graphic for the back, take a ruler and connect the dotted lines on the front (the black and white side) of the cards before you cut them out.

For my young children, I made two sets of the first page (the easy patterns) so we could play “Go Fish”.  I also played matching the cards with them, because  matching these patterns is often a challenge for  young beginning students. They also love to play the patterns on rhythm instruments.

With older students, we simply tap some cards at the end of  lessons or string them together to make a phrase and tap. Sometimes I put a few of the cards on a table and one person taps while the other guesses the correct pattern.  

These cards are very useful as a review for the bonus question of the Texas theory test. They are also helpful when a student is first learning eighth notes.

I am certainly open to suggestions on more ways to use these. If you have a good game or idea, please leave a comment here to share with others!

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Filed under Games, Rhythm, Texas State Theory Test

The Incredible Whole Rest – Another NoteBoy Poster

The Incredible Whole Rest

The Incredible Whole Rest

Do your students think that a whole rest always gets 4 beats? If so, they probably get confused when they are asked to add a rest for the entire measure in 3/4 time and not use dotted rests! According to the Oxford Concise Dictionary of Music, “The whole-note rest is used as a whole measure rest, irrespective of the actual time-value of the measure.”

I print out my NoteBoy posters on cardstock and laminate them. Then I place them on the sofa table in my studio for students to read and chuckle before their lesson. Humor has a way of sticking to your memory!

Teachers always ask me who is the note with the red cape and mask who always has a little comment to make. He is Mighty Dot, the super hero who wears black and flies to notes to make them longer. He’s a powerful guy. In my mind he has an accent kind of like Zorro, and he is an expert in rhythm and all things theory related!

If you are not familiar with my NoteBoy posters, check them out. There are NoteBoy posters on all kinds of music theory, such as lead sheet, ledger lines, and chord inversions, and they are all my gift to your music students.  My students love them! Let me know if yours do, too!

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Filed under NoteBoys, Rhythm, Teaching Business, Texas State Theory Test, Theory

I Can Count Rhythm – a Beginning Worksheet

I Can Count RhythmsI Can Count Rhythm

Today I am posting the second worksheet in my “I Can” series for young beginners. My last post was I Can Write the Music Alphabet. The one I am posting today reviews rhythm. I think that it is also big enough to use on the iPad.

As with all of my worksheets, this is free for personal use. In order to print, click on the picture or the link below the picture. That will take you to another page, where you will select “download”.

I am working on a worksheet like this for rests, so hold on and I’ll post it this week. Meanwhile, don’t forget these fun rhythm games for the younger set: Quarter Note Hunt, Fish Rhythm Matching CardsRhythm Round About, and Counting Up the Mountain. Average age beginners will learn rhythm values quickly with the black ink Rhythm Memory Game.

If you use all of these games with your beginning students, they will probably learn rhythm note values very easily!

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Filed under Preschool Music Resources, Rhythm, Texas State Theory Test, Worksheets

Jingle Bells with Rhythm Instruments at a Group Lesson

Jingle Bells with instruments

I bought the electronic version of the new book by Philip Johnston called The Dynamic Studio: How to keep students, dazzle parents, and build the music studio everyone wants to get into. (Disclosure: I am an Amazon Affiliate because I get questions about where to buy the things I write about. Amazon sends me a few cents if a reader buys something from clicking  the book link.) Philip Johnston writes inspiring books that get me enthused to teach in different ways. One of his main ideas is to be different; don’t always do the same thing. Maybe that was on my mind when I decided to use rhythm instruments in my group lessons.

After an unsuccessful search for an easy piano/rhythm band ensemble I could use in a group lesson without a lot of preparation, I wrote my own.  I arranged this specifically to be easy enough that they could be successful without having to practice, so please keep that in mind.

I  wrote the second piano part for an electric bass, which some students can play. This part can also be played on the piano, so I call it Piano 2 in the score. You can also use bells or any other tuned instrument, and it sounds fine to omit it.

The first group was my youngest students. They absolutely loved the instruments. But if you have ever used rhythm instruments with young children, you know what a challenge they are.  I didn’t mind that some of them could not play the written part and just played the steady beat.  I was surprised that a few of them actually followed the score. I let the little beginner on the bells shake them through the entire song rather than the way I wrote it in the score. No one in that group reads well enough for the piano part. I had to play by ear because I could not find the piano score! That seemed to amuse the young group.

The second group of 9 and 10-year-old students was absolutely the right age for this activity. Without any practice, (except for the Piano 1 part, which I gave to a 5th grader the week before) they were able to read the score and play the correct rhythm. We traded instruments and repeated it a few times. I am only sorry that I didn’t record it, because they did really well. The student playing the piano part was thrilled to be part of an ensemble.

After that, we changed directions and performed on the piano for each other using good performance skills. Everyone had learned a Christmas song or a favorite piece. That did not take too long and we went on to the next activity.

They had all been looking at the electric bass and wondering why it was there. We discussed the history of the electric bass and how it was like the double bass. I also got in some theory with the older groups, as we discussed the root of chords and how that is an easy way to play the bass. This is where taking our state theory exam really helped. I demonstrated with my meager guitar skills (Me on the electric bass, how funny was that!) and then let them all try it.

Our last activity was playing a Thanksgiving board game, with different level cards for each age group. I was relieved my students enjoyed the game because I had not tried it out with a group. Even my older students had fun and reviewed some theory at the same time. Finally, we just had enough time to pass out cookies and candy canes, and they all left happy.

Later I asked what was their favorite activity. Can you guess what it was? The rhythm instruments! So with that in mind, I am sharing my simple score with you. Feel free to change the instruments to whatever you have on hand, even homemade instruments.

Obviously you don’t need a score for this simple rhythm section, but my students found it interesting, and it helped me focus. If one of your students has a family member who can play the Piano 2 part on the electric bass or any other instrument, that would be really fun, especially for a Christmas recital! Please alert me if you find any mistakes in my score, as I don’t have an editor. Have fun and if you have a successful performance, let me know!

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Filed under Christmas, Group lesson ideas, Holiday Music, Rhythm