Category Archives: Rhythm

Made for the iPad: Drawing Rests

Made_For_iPad_Rests

Lets Draw Rests Bundle

As part of my Made for the iPad series, here are rests to draw on a mobile device. To open and write on them in a tablet, see my previous tutorial on an app that can be used for all tablets, including an Android and Kindle.

For best results when writing on a tablet, you will need a stylus, but an inexpensive one will work.

Included in this bundle are whole, half, quarter, eighth, and sixteenth rests.

If you have a tablet, go ahead and try this! It will save you a lot of paper and ink.

Please let me know if you find these useful!

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Filed under iPad Ideas, Rhythm

Made for the iPad: More Rhythm Notes

 

I’m gradually trying to add more to my Made for the iPad page. To find this page, go to the top menu bar and select “Free”, then “Newer Free Resources,” then “iPad Resources,” and you will see a collection of materials I use on my iPad. This is also how you can get to my old site. Just select “Older Resources.”

Today I am posting four more rhythm pages to draw on a mobile tablet.  Check out this post for more notes, and go here for a tutorial of a free, easy app to draw on worksheets with several mobile devices. According to the developer, the app works on an iPad, Android tablet, Kindle Fire, and Windows tablet, which is pretty amazing. [Disclosure: I am not affiliated with this app in any way and I discovered it by accident a few year ago.]

My iPad page is a work in progress.  If you are successfully using any of my material on your tablet, please email me with some feedback. Pictures are great, too!

Subscribe to this blog, “like” my page on Facebook, or follow me on Pinterest to keep up with new material.

Let’s Draw Dotted Half Notes

Let’s Draw Eighth Notes

Lets Draw 16th Notes

Let’s Draw Upside Down Notes

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Filed under iPad Ideas, Rhythm

Made for the iPad: Drawing Rhythm Notes

Made_For_iPad

In my last post, I showed you one way to use worksheets on your tablet device, such as an iPad, Kindle Fire, Android, or Windows tablet. Today I am giving you some pages to practice drawing notes on your tablet in a piano lesson. I will be posting more pages in this series, so check back. [Edited: Here is the link where I list all my iPad resources including dotted half notes, eighth notes, 16th notes, stem down notes, and more. I will also be adding rests very soon.]

Lets-Draw-Treble-Clef

Let’s Draw a Treble Clef

Lets-Draw-Bass-Clef

Lets Draw a Bass Clef

Lets-Draw-Whole-Notes

Lets Draw a Whole Note

Lets-Draw-HalfNote

Lets Draw a Half Note

Lets-Draw-QuarterNotes

 Lets Draw a Quarter Note

When I teach students how to draw notes, I like to start with the whole note and then show how to add lines to make it a half note. Fill in a half note and it becomes a quarter note. This way students see that every note has a note head the same size as a whole note. If I don’t do that, I usually have little teeny quarter and eighth notes and giant, bloated whole notes! I’ve also seen students waste time in ear training by, for example, erasing half notes, when all they need to do is fill in the half note to make it a quarter note.

One reason I like to make worksheets for a mobile device is because I can use lots of color and not worry about the cost of printing. That being said, teachers can print one of each, put into sheet protectors, and used with a dry erase pen. I do not recommend printing these for a student binder unless  you have a special student.

[For my UK & Down Under readers, I know you would like these with the correct rhythm terms, so I’ll be working on that as time permits. When I finish, I’ll add it to the UK page. For now, maybe you can just write over the North American terms.]

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Filed under iPad Ideas, Rhythm

Rhythm Bingo for 3/8, 6/8, and 9/8 Time Signatures

RhythmBingoCompound

Compound Meter Bingo Boards [print in landscape orientation]

Compound Meter Bingo Calling Cards [print in portrait orientation]

One of my students looked wistfully at a game I had out and sighed real big. He said, “I know, I’m getting older and can’t be playing games like I used to.” He looked so pitiful and sad. I have to remind myself that games make learning theory more fun for all ages, not just my younger students. Take rhythms in 6/8, for example. Just about every student needs some extra help with compound meter. In this game there are plenty of 16th notes and rests to challenge students in 3/8, 6/8, and 9/8 time signatures. If your older students are taking a music theory test this spring, here is a good way to review rhythm for the test.

Teachers are always telling me I don’t make anything for older students. Actually I do, but material often gets hidden inside the files and becomes hard to find.  I’m going to try to make the intermediate material easier to find, if I can think of a way. I have a new search category, “Older Students” but it will take me time to go back through all my posts and add it, so be patient. Suggestions are always welcome!

By the way,  the 3/8 time signature is not compound meter but simple meter. However, I needed another row and it was either 3/8 or 12/8, so I went with 3/8.

Print the game boards on card stock in landscape orientation and laminate, if desired. Print the calling cards on perforated business card stock for 2 x 3.5 sized business cards.

Objective

  • To review rhythm patterns in 3/8, 6/8, and 9/8 time signatures

 Ages

  • Older students who have been introduced to the time signatures and 16th notes and rests in the game

 Number of Players

  • Two to six players, plus the teacher to draw and play the rhythm cards
  • Game may also be played by one student and teacher

Materials

  • Game board and rhythm card printables
  • At least 9 bingo tokens for each player

Directions

  • Print the game boards on card stock in landscape orientation. Laminate.
  • Print the calling cards on perforated 2 x 3.5 business card stock in portrait orientation. Separate or cut the cards.
  • Mix the cards up so that the time signatures are mixed evenly.
  • Give each player a Bingo board card and tokens.
  • The teacher draws a calling card, tells the students which time signature it is, and plays the rhythm.
  • If the student has the rhythm, he covers it with his token.
  • The game proceeds with the teacher drawing cards and playing the rhythms.
  • The first player to cover all the squares on his board is the winner.
  • To play with student and teacher, each player takes turns drawing and tapping the rhythm on the card. If that rhythm is on his card, he covers it with a token.

Why I Like This Game

  • It is a good game for group lessons with teens.
  • Students like Bingo games and this give them rhythm confidence.

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Filed under Games, Group lesson ideas, Rhythm