Category Archives: Rhythm

Color Coded Rhythm Pattern Cards

Rhythm Strips-3

Rhythm Cards Set 1

Rhythm Cards Set 2

Rhythm Cards Set 3

I’m back from a wonderful piano camp with Elizabeth Gutierrez and the nicest group of teachers you could ever want to talk to! I am so glad I got to meet them and to visit San Antonio again. Today I am posting a set of rhythm flash cards that are *color coded* so that I can quickly pull out the ones I need. That really helps me save time.  The flash cards start at primer level and progress up to intermediate. The levels below are not meant to go along with any specific method book, but are simply the progression I made the cards, especially at the later levels.

  • Red = Beginning Set
  • Aqua = Set  2A (8th notes)
  • Green = Set  2B (dotted quarters)
  • Purple = Set 3 (6/8 and triplets)
  • Yellow = Set 4 (16th notes)
  • Blue = Set 5 (dotted eighths)
  • Magenta = Set 6 (5-note tuplet and quarter note triplet)

These cards are in 3 separate PDF files to make it easier to print just the levels you need. There are 2 cards to a page. (My web go-to guy told me not to make my PDF files too big because it might cause the site to crash.) Remember to set your printer in landscape orientation. I can think of about 50 ways to use these cards, but that is a future post. I bet you can come up with lots of ideas!

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Filed under Rhythm, Teaching Aids, Texas State Theory Test

Crotchets, Quavers, and Minims…Oh, My! Worksheets With UK Vocabulary

UK WorksheetsPP-2

[Ed. I will use this post to list all past and future material with British terminology, as well as the material in the graphic above.]

Sometimes I forget that not every English-speaking person uses the same music vocabulary. Thanks to some help from a British teacher, here are some of my rhythm worksheets that I have re-made using crotchets, minims, quavers, and semibreves.  I also changed measure to bar, staff to stave, and the spelling of yogurt. I hope I haven’t made any mistakes because a lot of this was new to me!

When you open a file, you do not have to print each page. Print only what you need. Check out my FAQ if you do not know how to do this.

UK Rhythm Worksheets is a colorful set of 5 beginning level worksheets.

UK Memory Games  is a set of matching games. There are two games in this file, both for beginners. One features rhythm values and the other has basic vocabulary words. Cut them out and place the cards face down. Students (or student and teacher) take turns turning 2 cards up, trying to find a match. You can read more about how to play these games on my website, such as this page.

UK Rhythm Review is a set of 6 levels of rhythm worksheets. This is a good way to find out how much transfer students know or use as a review.

UK Grand Staves is a set of color and black and white grand staves. Two have the notes written in, and two are blank so students can write in the notes.

UK Rhythm Round About Game Cards go with the Rhythm Round About Game. This is a GREAT game to teach rhythm vocabulary. It’s very colorful and uses lots of ink, but beginning students love it.

I included the UK in the name of the files so it would help you distinguish which ones are new. I hope all my friends from around the world who use these terms will find these printables useful.

Now I really wish I had a pot of tea and some scones with clotted cream and jam!

 

 

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Filed under Group lesson ideas, Rhythm, Theory

Individual Rhythm Flash Cards

Rhythm Flash Cards

Rhythm Flash Cards

These rhythm flash cards are about the size of a deck of playing cards. They are small enough for students to hold in their hands to play card games. A variety of levels are included, from beginning to late intermediate, whole notes to dotted eighths and sixteenths.

There are 6 pages of flash cards in this printable. The last page is a colorful graphic designed for the back of the cards so they are more fun. You can print only the pages of the cards you need. You will have to reinsert the graphic for the back of the cards into your printer. If you are not sure how to do this, look at the FAQ on this blog. Scroll down until you see “How to Print On Both Sides of Flash Cards.”

To keep the pattern for the back of the cards lined up evenly and to look nice, I didn’t make a cutting line all the way across the page. Instead, there is a thin white line to cut on.

If you are not going to print the colorful graphic for the back, take a ruler and connect the dotted lines on the front (the black and white side) of the cards before you cut them out.

For my young children, I made two sets of the first page (the easy patterns) so we could play “Go Fish”.  I also played matching the cards with them, because  matching these patterns is often a challenge for  young beginning students. They also love to play the patterns on rhythm instruments.

With older students, we simply tap some cards at the end of  lessons or string them together to make a phrase and tap. Sometimes I put a few of the cards on a table and one person taps while the other guesses the correct pattern.  

These cards are very useful as a review for the bonus question of the Texas theory test. They are also helpful when a student is first learning eighth notes.

I am certainly open to suggestions on more ways to use these. If you have a good game or idea, please leave a comment here to share with others!

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Filed under Games, Rhythm, Texas State Theory Test

The Incredible Whole Rest – Another NoteBoy Poster

The Incredible Whole Rest

The Incredible Whole Rest

Do your students think that a whole rest always gets 4 beats? If so, they probably get confused when they are asked to add a rest for the entire measure in 3/4 time and not use dotted rests! According to the Oxford Concise Dictionary of Music, “The whole-note rest is used as a whole measure rest, irrespective of the actual time-value of the measure.”

I print out my NoteBoy posters on cardstock and laminate them. Then I place them on the sofa table in my studio for students to read and chuckle before their lesson. Humor has a way of sticking to your memory!

Teachers always ask me who is the note with the red cape and mask who always has a little comment to make. He is Mighty Dot, the super hero who wears black and flies to notes to make them longer. He’s a powerful guy. In my mind he has an accent kind of like Zorro, and he is an expert in rhythm and all things theory related!

If you are not familiar with my NoteBoy posters, check them out. There are NoteBoy posters on all kinds of music theory, such as lead sheet, ledger lines, and chord inversions, and they are all my gift to your music students.  My students love them! Let me know if yours do, too!

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Filed under NoteBoys, Rhythm, Teaching Business, Texas State Theory Test, Theory