Category Archives: Theory

Droid Key Signatures

DroidKeysSigs

Droid Key Signatures

Happy New Year everyone! As the New Year starts, I want to thank everyone for your support. Without you, this website would not be possible and I sincerely appreciate all you do to help out.

Today I am posting 2 worksheets. These were made for students ages 9 to 11.

I wanted to make a worksheet to review key signatures, but it needed to be a little special, not just another boring worksheet. So I thought of the idea of making a secret code for some of the famous quotes from Star Wars.

IMPORTANT:  When you use this, don’t tell them the quotes are from Star Wars! If you do, and they have seen the original Star Wars movie, they will fill out the missing letters without bothering to fill in the key signatures. Don’t ask me how I know this. Let me just say that I test everything out with my students!

The first worksheet includes the major keys of C,G,D,A,E,B and F. The second worksheet contains C,G,D,A,E, plus F, B flat, E flat, and A flat.  Be sure to encourage students to put the flat sign on the keys B flat, E flat, and A flat. It doesn’t help solve the message, but it is important they get used to adding the flats. I ask my student what if they are playing in a band and the key is E flat, but they wrote down E. And then I play Jingle Bells with one hand in the key of E and the other in E flat!

This turned out to be a fun way to review key signatures! I hope your students like it, too!

 

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Filed under Theory, Worksheets

Fun with Frogs: Beginning Rhythm

Today’s post includes some beginning rhythm fun sheets continuing with the frog theme. I made these to help students learn rhythm note names. We can work on counting, meter, and keeping a steady beat at their lessons. In addition, I tried these sheets and the ones I posted Monday on an iPad with a 7-year-old, and they worked just fine, after I helped him figure out the best way to hold the stylus.  So, while these print out well and don’t use too much ink, they will also work on your tablet.

FunWithFrogsRhythmFun with Frogs – Beginning Rhythm

I promised my faithful UK readers a version with their rhythm vocabulary!

Fun With Frogs Rhythm UK

Frog Rhythm UK version

To those of you who can’t figure out how to use an iPad for these, I am here to help. But please send an email rather than leave a comment. Speaking of email, I discovered that all the emails that were sent from this site for the last few months went into my spam folder and were deleted. So if I never answered your question, please try again. :)

Fun With Frogs on an iPad
Fun With Frogs on an iPad

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Filed under iPad Ideas, Preschool Music Resources, Rhythm, Texas State Theory Test, Theory, Worksheets

Blackberry Sherbet Dotted Quarter Notes

BlackberrySherbetRhythm

Blackberry Sherbet Rhythm

When I was growing up, summers for me always meant going blackberry picking. We would wear long sleeves and gloves to keep the thorns from hurting and we would bring along all our dogs to “chase the snakes away.” The dogs must have done their job because I never saw a snake, and we were always deep in the woods. The best part that made it all worth while was blackberry pie. I wish I knew where I could pick wild blackberries in Texas because they really do make better pies than the cultivated ones!

I tried to draw a blackberry pie image for this worksheet but it didn’t look very much like summer, so I decided a cool, delicious blackberry sherbet would be fun.

Blackberry Sherbet Rhythm is a worksheet to review dotted quarter notes in 4 meter.  It is a little different from the last one I posted where students only add bar lines. In order to be more age appropriate, this one also has students adding missing notes and time signatures.  It is a good review for theory exams.

The best way to teach dotted quarter notes is to show how the dotted note equals 3 eighth notes tied together. It always needs an 8th note (or anything that equals an 8th note) to be complete in 4 meter. If students are having trouble, I get out my handy Rhythm Pizza and show them or even the Rhythm in the Grid printable. (These two are pretty old, so if you can’t download them, email me.) Then they need a lot of practice tapping and saying it. I use the Kodaly syllables “tum-ti” but there are many more.

On an older post I have links to all the Summer Treats material I’ve posted so far in case you want to bundle them all up. Here is the link.

My students are using the color version on my iPad. If you want to save ink, print one and put it in a clear sheet protector and use a dry erase marker. Store all the worksheets in a binder. I also included a black and white version if you need to save ink.

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Filed under Rhythm, Theory, Worksheets

Make Your Own Big Magnetic Staff Board

Magnetic-Staff-Board

Magnetic Board Symbols-1

I’ve always wanted one of those big magnetic white boards  with a  music staff. They are expensive, however, so for years I’ve been planning on making my own. Recently my daughter moved and gave me an almost brand new 3’x 2′ magnetic board!

I’ve been using the magnetic board at every lesson to teach how to place sharps and flats on the staff  in order to construct key signatures.  All of my students have said it is so much easier to learn them this way. It’s also a great way to show beginners stem direction, and even learn note names. It is a lot faster and more fun than using a worksheet, too. This has been so helpful in my studio that I can’t imagine why I waited so long to actually make it!

I thought about using a marker to draw the staff lines on my board, but I was afraid I would mess it up.  Instead I decided to use 1/4″ art tape, also called drafting tape or artist tape. [Disclosure: This link to my Amazon store is just to show you art tape, and the current price is less than what I paid for mine at a craft store. Please buy it where you find the best price.] I think wider tape looks too big for the size of my notes. I wanted my lines to be about the size of a line I would draw on the board, if I had steady hands!

Magnetic white boards are a lot more expensive than the non-magnetic variety. The most expensive places are office supply stores. Sometimes Amazon has great buys, but be sure to buy the magnetic variety if you mail order one. If it doesn’t specifically say it is magnetic, it is not. Here are some suggestions to get one at the best price:

  • Use a 40% coupon at Michaels or Hobby Lobby.
  • Check out Sam’s or Cosco.
  • Buy a giant size oil changing pan at Walmart and spray paint it white. This is the real do-it-yourself method, because the big pans are under $15.00. (Make sure it is magnetic.)

It is very important to me that the symbols are “see through” just like notes on a page. So BEFORE I laminated anything, I cut out the inside white part of each symbol. Just remember, cut it out before you laminate!

 Material

  • Ready made magnetic white board about 3′ x 2″
  • Or a large metal oil pan and white spray paint, if you make your own board
  • 1/4″ black art tape
  • Heavy Paper or card stock
  • Scissors
  • Small scissors and/or craft knife
  • Template for lines
  • Thermal laminator and lamination pouches (film)
  • Magnetic tape
  • Tiny bit of glue
  • Sharpie for touch ups
  • Ruler

Instructions

Print the symbol pages with black ink and cut out each symbol. Cut out the inside of each symbol with small scissors so that there is no white showing. I cut a slit with a craft knife before I cut the inside but that is optional. Use a black sharpie along the edges if needed to cover up little bits of white.

Use your whole note as a measure to determine the size of your staff.  My staff lines are 1 1/2″ from the top of the tape line to the top of the next tape line, but you should measure your printed notes and make the lines to fit.  With a ruler make a template to show the placement of the tape.

Line up the template where you want to put the lines for the staff.  Cut tape the length of your white board and place 5 lines horizontally on the board.  In this photo, you can see I discovered the staff is too close to the edge for high ledger lines notes, so I plan to move it down. Originally I was going to make a grand staff. Staff_Whiteboard

Place the cut symbols and notes into lamination pouches. Leave enough room around each symbol so that they can be cut in rectangles and squares for ease in handling.

Staff_Whiteboard2

The Bass Clef

The dots on the bass clef should be cut out separately. Place the cut out bass clef (without the dots) inside the laminating pouch and lay it over your template. Open the pouch. Put a little bit of glue on a toothpick to glue the dots in the correct place on the laminating pouch.  The dots will need to be centered on each side of the bass F line. The glue will hold the dots in place. Then close the laminating pouch and run it through the laminator. This worked great for me and was not as hard as it sounds. Now the dots are “floating” beside the clef. My students keep asking me how I did it!

BassClef

Cut small pieces of magnetic tape and place it on the back of each symbol. Well, it wouldn’t be a Magnetic Board without magnets! :) Trim the tape as needed to fit the symbol. Every symbol needs at least 2 pieces of magnetic tape and the bigger symbols need more.

The free printable contains:

  • 1 Treble Clef
  • 1 Bass Clef
  • 8 Whole Notes
  • 7 Flats
  • 7 Sharps
  • 2 Naturals 
  • 2 Double Sharps

To conclude, it was not hard to make my magnetic staff board and symbols. In fact it was a lot easier than writing this post which took me about a week! I find it hard to write directions, so please leave a comment if you have a question about the instructions or even a suggestion! If you have made a magnetic board with an oil pan, give us some tips! I’m not sure how many do-it-yourselfers are out there, so let me know if you would like me to post some more big symbols such as time signatures, bar lines, and rhythm notes!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Teaching Aids, Theory, Uncategorized