MetaMoji Note – an app for writing on the iPad and other tablets

Today I want to share MetaMoji Note Lite (also known as Note Anytime). This PDF annotator is a snap to use and it has versions for the iPad, Kindle Fire, Windows, and Android tablets. On the MetaMoji site there is a list of the features that are in each version.

This app is great for anyone who wants to draw on a document, photo, or blank page. I particularly like how easy it is to open a PDF document in a lesson.

This tutorial is for the free iPad version.  [Disclosure: I received no  compensation for this review, I was not furnished the app, I have not communicated with the company, and these are my personal opinions.]

1. Download the app from iTunes on your iPad. You can also download it to your iPhone.

2. On today’s post, select this PDF file, Let’s Draw a Treble Clef, and open it on your iPad or iPhone.

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3. At the top right corner there will appear the words “Open in iBooks” and beside that, there will be the words “Open In…

Select  “Open In” and below that a tab will open up icons of all the apps on your iPad that can open PDF documents. Remember, just because your iPad lists all the apps that will open a PDF for you to read, it doesn’t mean that you can also write on the PDF. Scroll across until you get to the one that says “Open in Note” and select it.

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4. Now you will see a window that says “Import“.  Select “As New Note” and then select “Done“. The graphic below shows my PDF opened in MetaMoji Note Lite. Use the pinch gesture to drag the worksheet to make it larger.

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5. At the top you will see an icon that looks like a pencil. Select it and the lines that appear are the pen settings for the lines you will draw with your stylus or finger. Select one and hold it. Another small window will open and you can choose the color and thickness of your line. I chose the calligraphy pen with the two-tone color. Select “done”. Below you can see the lines I drew with the calligraphy pen using different colors.

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Now you are ready for your student to write on the worksheet!

When you finish, you can select the box with the arrow pointing up to see ways you can save this PDF. I usually don’t save my student’s work, but I do save the PDF to use again with another student. To see your saved PDF’s, select the folder in the top left of the tool bar.

Another great thing about this app is that you can open multi page PDF documents. There are not too many free PDF annotators that will do that.

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In the graphic above, I have labeled the tool bar, but it is really simple to use. The screen lock keeps the PDF from being written on. If you have an impulsive student who wants to start writing before you have explained something, keep the screen locked. The pencil tool is  for drawing and writing by hand. The eraser will erase all of your markings, but will not erase the original PDF. The lasso tool allows you to select something you have drawn and move it around the screen. This comes in handy if you have a PDF of a music staff  and you want to draw a note and move it around the screen. Your PDF will remain unchanged. The undo button will clear your PDF so you can use it again.

If you want a white board to write on without a PDF, select the save tool on the top left, and open a blank document. Then you can practice drawing any musical symbol without using paper. Click the + tool to see some pre-made art you can select. I used the heart icon on a blank staff as a note, and we moved it around naming the “note.”

What a PDF annotator will not do is allow you to cut and paste the original PDF.

There is a wrist guard on the bottom right of the screen that keep students from making accidental markings with their wrists. Simply grab it from the corner to enlarge it or flip it around.

This app has many other features that I am not going into. There are even more extra features in the paid version. At their website, you can view several short video tutorials to get started. I found this app so easy that I didn’t need the help features, but if you can get all kinds of support at their website. And you can always ask your students for help because they always seem to know how to use anything on the iPad!

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Valentine Composing Printable for Beginners

ComposingValentine

Valentine Composing Activity for Beginners

Some years ago I posted a black and red version of this. As it happens with a lot of old material, I  forgot about it until it started showing up on Pinterest. It looked rather dated and I didn’t like it anymore.  I decided to do a makeover by adding more colors and flowers.

This is a fun Valentine’s “gift” for students to give to a special adult, especially if they can play it for them!

Objective

  • To compose a melody to a familiar Valentine rhyme
  • To review finger numbers

 Age

  • Pre-school to about age 7

 Materials

  • The printable
  • Pencil
  • Piano keyboard

Directions

  • Students place their right hand on the keys with the thumb or index finger on middle C
  • Starting on middle C, they make up a tune and write the correct finger numbers or letter names in the hearts
  • The tune sounds better if it starts and ends on C
  • Alternatively, students can use their left hand, the black keys, or use another position, such as G
  • Help younger students with the writing

Why I Like This Activity

  • It helps students become more interested in composing

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Filed under Composing Activities, Preschool Music Resources, Valentine's Day

Rhythm Bingo for 3/8, 6/8, and 9/8 Time Signatures

RhythmBingoCompound

Compound Meter Bingo Boards [print in landscape orientation]

Compound Meter Bingo Calling Cards [print in portrait orientation]

One of my students looked wistfully at a game I had out and sighed real big. He said, “I know, I’m getting older and can’t be playing games like I used to.” He looked so pitiful and sad. I have to remind myself that games make learning theory more fun for all ages, not just my younger students. Take rhythms in 6/8, for example. Just about every student needs some extra help with compound meter. In this game there are plenty of 16th notes and rests to challenge students in 3/8, 6/8, and 9/8 time signatures. If your older students are taking a music theory test this spring, here is a good way to review rhythm for the test.

Teachers are always telling me I don’t make anything for older students. Actually I do, but material often gets hidden inside the files and becomes hard to find.  I’m going to try to make the intermediate material easier to find, if I can think of a way. I have a new search category, “Older Students” but it will take me time to go back through all my posts and add it, so be patient. Suggestions are always welcome!

By the way,  the 3/8 time signature is not compound meter but simple meter. However, I needed another row and it was either 3/8 or 12/8, so I went with 3/8.

Print the game boards on card stock in landscape orientation and laminate, if desired. Print the calling cards on perforated business card stock for 2 x 3.5 sized business cards.

Objective

  • To review rhythm patterns in 3/8, 6/8, and 9/8 time signatures

 Ages

  • Older students who have been introduced to the time signatures and 16th notes and rests in the game

 Number of Players

  • Two to six players, plus the teacher to draw and play the rhythm cards
  • Game may also be played by one student and teacher

Materials

  • Game board and rhythm card printables
  • At least 9 bingo tokens for each player

Directions

  • Print the game boards on card stock in landscape orientation. Laminate.
  • Print the calling cards on perforated 2 x 3.5 business card stock in portrait orientation. Separate or cut the cards.
  • Mix the cards up so that the time signatures are mixed evenly.
  • Give each player a Bingo board card and tokens.
  • The teacher draws a calling card, tells the students which time signature it is, and plays the rhythm.
  • If the student has the rhythm, he covers it with his token.
  • The game proceeds with the teacher drawing cards and playing the rhythms.
  • The first player to cover all the squares on his board is the winner.
  • To play with student and teacher, each player takes turns drawing and tapping the rhythm on the card. If that rhythm is on his card, he covers it with a token.

Why I Like This Game

  • It is a good game for group lessons with teens.
  • Students like Bingo games and this give them rhythm confidence.

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Easy Valentine Piano Music

Valentine Music_Revised

This post has links to all of the Valentine music currently on my website.

Remember last year when I posted these links?  Well, as some of you know, I’ve been trying to revise all my pre-reading and primer level music to vertical (portrait) orientation, rather than horizontal (landscape). The reason I put this level in landscape in the first place is that there is more room for big notes. But it is so hard to use in a 3-ring binder! I’m determined to eventually remake all of my landscape scores!

Question of the day: Do you like the borders I draw? Do you think they add something, or do they make it harder to print. I’m just curious what other teachers think.

Valentines Day PR  – pre-reading with finger numbers only, on the black keys.

Roses are Red – pre-reading with finger numbers only, on the black keys.

Chocolate Valentines Pre-reading version is played on the white keys using all the fingers.

Chocolate Valentines On the Staff  came about because one of my students saw the pre-reading version and asked me to make one for her on the staff. We made it longer by playing it several times, each time in a different octave.

Here are the rest of the Valentine’s Day folk songs from my website that that I have arranged in various levels.

Love Somebody, Yes I Do – Late Elementary (with 8th notes)

Love Somebody, Yes I Do – Primer Level (5-finger position on the staff)

Love Somebody, Yes I Do – Pre-reading

There’s a Little Wheel A-Turning in My Heart –  Early Intermediate (lots of hands together and some finger substitutions)

Below is the graphic I made last year. All the music on the left is now in portrait orientation!

8 Valentine Pieces

8 Valentine Pieces

 

 

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Filed under Holiday Music, Pre-reading, Valentine's Day