Rhythm Review 1-6 Revised

Rhythm Review Levels 1-3

Rhythm Review 1-3

Rhythm Review Levels 4-6

Rhythm Review Levels 4-6

I’ve mentioned before that a lot of the theory worksheets I post are for the Texas MTA theory exams. These exams are in twelve levels, one for each grade. The early grades are not hard and they are a great way for teachers to discover if their students are really remembering all the theory we teach in lessons. If you are in an area that offers theory exams, consider them!

Last year, after several years of hard work, the TMTA theory tests were revised. In my studio, that means I need to revise all my theory worksheets. It is a daunting challenge, but I’ve been slowly trying.

Today’s post contains rhythm questions for grades one through six and up to about level 4 in most method books. In the top left corner of each page, I numbered the tests with the TMTA level to keep them straight, but teachers can certainly use these sheets to reinforce rhythm concepts at any grade. You all know I love silly cartoons, but I tried really hard to make these pages friendly looking, and not cartoony. They use less ink than the originals, and they can be used with any age.

See any mistakes? Let me know!
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Filed under Intermediate Students, Rhythm, Texas State Theory Test, Theory, Worksheets

Wings on Ice – Early Intermediate Piano Solo

Wings On Ice

Wings on Ice $2.95

All the music in my store comes with an unlimited printing license within your personal studio. 

When I asked one of my students what her favorite sport was, she didn’t hesitate to say, “ice dancing.”  She said she had never skated on ice, but she just loved to watch it. I wrote this for her and I was so glad she liked it. She was a wonderful young musician and she played scales effortlessly, but sight-reading was sometimes a challenge. Fast forward about ten years and she plays the piano for her church.

Recently, I took a good look at this piece and decided I could do more to make it easier for students to read. I changed a lot of things from the original version. It is in C Major, with scale fingerings in the right hand and two-note slurs in the left.

I’m now happy to announce that this revised version is newly released in my store. It is an accessible piece, good for students who learn by ear. I think it is one of those pieces that sounds harder than it is, but I will let others decide that. Use it in recitals or festivals, or just for fun.

If you are looking for a recital piece, head over to my store. The store helps to support this site.

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Write the Grand Staff from G to F

Write the Grand Staff from G to F

The Grand Staff from G to F

In this worksheet, students write the name of the note inside each note. You can also have them draw lines to the corresponding piano keys if you have time. It can even be inserted into their binder as a handy guide.

Typically, piano students are taught the notes on the treble staff and the bass staff. But many times students don’t realize the logical continuity of the grand staff. We know the grand staff is more than two separate entities, one for right hand and one for left. However, there is just so much to teach in so little time that it is easy to have short cuts to learning concepts in order to get everything covered. If you have ever had students who need to see the overall picture of the grand staff, this little work sheet might help. It shows clearly how the music alphabet continues from bass to treble staff.

Elizabeth Gutierrez suggests using A C E to learn the grand staff.  My students find A C E easier than some other ways. It also helps them to learn the inner ledger lines. So I have students circle all the ACE’s on the grand staff. There is no reason you can’t use guide notes, A C E or FACE, or Every Good Boy Does Fine, or whatever you find successful with a particular student.

Learning note names will not necessarily make students good sight readers. Different parts of the brain are used to identify notes than to actually sight-read notes at the piano. However, learning notes will help our students become overall better musicians. Learning note names can be difficult for some students, but we have to keep trying!

Here is a little tidbit for your students. The phrase GRAND STAFF starts with G and ends with F. How is that for a coincidence!

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Let’s Play Ball Worksheets

Lets Play Ball Worksheet

Lets Play Ball Worksheets

I made the Let’s Play Ball worksheet a few years ago for a student who loved baseball. The original one I posted was for piano keys only, and while I actually tried to make a staff version at the same time, I found it almost finished, abandoned and forgotten in my computer files. I finished it up because I have a student who just tried out and made a new baseball team and I thought he would enjoy this way of reinforcing note names. The instructions are to draw lines to connect the notes or keys to the alphabet letters.

These worksheets use some ink, which is why I like to use my iPad for handout like this. They both work really well on an iPad because all the student has to do is draw lines to connect the alphabet letter to the note on the staff or the piano key. Another ink saver is to make one copy and put it in a sheet protector and then use dry or wet eraser markers. I like the sheet protector idea because they are easy to store in binder.

I want to mention to my long-time followers that I have been trying to get all my material listed in a way to make it easier to find.

If you select the Free tab at the top a new page will open.  Click on Newer Free Resources and scroll down to select the type of items you want.

I have finished moving all my old games to the “Game” page. There might be some floating around somewhere that I’m trying to find and add. Most of the holiday pages, except for holiday sheet music, is finished so you should be able to see almost all of the Valentine and St. Patrick’s day material.

 Now I’m working on the “Worksheet” page and I think it will take me a long time. Eventually I hope to get all the music and teaching aids from the old site moved over. If you find a broken link, please let me know so I can fix it.

When a site has as much material as this one, it can be hard to find things. What I do is a Google search such as: Susan Paradis fly flash cards. Google seems to do a better job than the search engine on my blog! I also have a Pinterest page where there are boards for all my material.

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Filed under Note Identification, Worksheets