LadyBug Game Revised

LadyBugGame

Lady Bug Game Board

LadyBug Game Cards

This is one of my favorite games. It’s fast and fun and I think it’s a good game to play this time of year. I’ve revised it and remade the keyboard cards.

Game Board

  • I suggest printing the colorful game board on photo paper and then laminating it so the colors really come to life. It can also be taken to an office shop. MTNA members, use Office Depot/Max and receive a big discount.

Cards

  • Before you print the cards, decide which pages you want to use. Please don’t print all the pages at once because the last page is the optional backs.
  • Print on card stock. They do not have to be laminated.
  • There are 5 pages of cards.
  • Pages 1-3 are notes on the staff.
  • Page 4 has keyboard cards.
  • Page 5 is the optional back of the cards. After printing the cards on pages 1-4,  insert the pages back into your printer to print the back of the cards. Please see my FAQ for a tutorial on how to do this.

Directions

  • This game can be played with students or teacher and student.
  • Each player has a token.
  • The cards are placed face down next to the game board.
  • The first player draws a card and moves their token forward along the path to the closest letter that matches the note on their card.
  • The next player draws and moves in the same way.
  • The game is over when someone draws a card that takes them to the last G or any note after the last G at the end of the path.
  • There are many games you can play with this game board.  Use your own ideas and I hope you have fun!

Objectives

  • To learn the music alphabet.
  • To learn to recognize notes on the grand staff or keys on a piano keyboard.
  • To reinforce learning steps and skips.

Ages

  • Early childhood and elementary ages.

Why I like this game

  • It’s fast, under 3 minutes, students always like it.
  • Children learn faster if they are having fun.
  • It’s a great game for beginners to learn piano key names.
  • The game is so fast, you can play more than once.

 

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Filed under Games, Group lesson ideas, Music Printables, Note Identification, Preschool Music Resources

Mother’s Day Beginning Composing

MothersDay

Mothers Day Composing Activity

Originally posted in 2008, I’ve revised the art and words, and put both the pre-reading and on-the-staff versions in the same file.  They use less ink, too. Print only the version you want and save paper!

If you have trouble printing these, please save them to your desk top or in any file and the file. If you subscribe to this blog, don’t try to print  from the email that you receive from WordPress. Also, if you have upgraded to Windows 10, you might not be able to open my files unless you make some changes. Check out my FAQ for more help.

Some students take meticulous care in writing their melody. Others dash it off as just one more thing they have to hurry through! Some like to add words and others want to change my rhythm all around. It’s interesting to watch their reaction and it’s fine with me! My rule is that it has to end on the tonic to work with my melody.

If you’ve never seen this kind of composing sheet, here is a quick tutorial.

Pre-reading

  • Use any 5-finger position.
  • Sing the first 8 measures.
  • Clap and count the rhythm of the last 8 measures until they know it well.
  • Students write in the finger numbers they want to use inside the flower pictures. Be sure to use pencil! A good composer is always revising!
  • Optional: Laminate and add a bow as a Mother’s Day present!

On-the-staff

  • Follow the same directions as above, except students write their melody on the staff.
  • Students who are more advanced like to write in chords or notes in the l.h. and melody in the right.
  • Beginning students limit their melody to the right hand in C position.
  • Explain a good sounding melody often will end on the 5th note of the scale in measure 12 and the tonic key note in the last measure. This is a great opportunity to discuss how to write a good melody.

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Filed under Composing Activities, Holiday Activities and Worksheets, Music Printables, Preschool Music Resources

Piano Camp Course by Jennifer Foxx

 

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This cute picture is a piano camp put on by Jennifer Foxx.

Jennifer Foxx and I have known each other for years, first on message boards (several in fact) a long time before Facebook, and then finally in person when we met at a MTNA convention. Jennifer is an expert in group piano games and activities for piano camps. She has been conducting them for many years and she knows the answer to everything, camp wise. She’s realistic, and she know what does and does not work. You might know Jennifer for her excellent tech reviews and suggestions on her blog.

She is now offering her expertise in the form of a video course for piano teachers. Maybe you’ve considered having a camp but you just don’t know how to get started. Or you like the idea, but don’t know where you can go to find games and activities.  This course will teach you everything you need to know and give you the confidence to try a music camp yourself!

I want to share her website with you where you can get all the information you need to sign up for her camp. And if you have questions, just ask her! She is always quick to respond!

http://music-educator-resources.teachable.com

 

[Disclosure: These opinions are my own and I received no compensation.]

 

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Filed under Group lesson ideas, Teaching Business

G. Henle Verlag iPad App Review

G. Henle Verlag is one of the highest quality music publishing companies in the world for urtext classical music. I have Henle editions in my library, and they are excellent.

Recently the company announced an app for the iPad and coming soon, Android.

Since I have experience with Henle editions, I downloaded the app to take a look. I thought that either the app would cost a fortune or it would have high-priced in-app purchases. I was pleasantly surprised to discover the app is free and the music is quite reasonably priced.

First of all, it is obvious that Henle has spent a lot of time and money on this app. True to the German way, it is very well done and elegant in its simplicity. I am not the most intuitive person when it comes to technology, but, honestly, this app is easy to use.

When you open the app, you are offered a free score and I chose a Beethoven Sonata. The app allowed me to:

  • Write annotations on the score.
  • Move annotations around on the score.
  • Print or email my annotated version.
  • Delete the fingerings in the score and even change them. You need to watch the video because this is an amazing feature!
  • Change the layout, making it bigger or smaller, and move the staves further apart. The music will wrap around to the next page automatically.
  • Use a Blue Tooth pedal page turner.
  • Turn on the metronome.
  • Use the built-in recorder.
  • Use the Apple pencil or inexpensive stylus.

You can check out the videos here that show what the app can do.

You are probably wondering how much these magic scores will cost. They are purchased with credits and the price starts at 10 credits for $.99, 20 credits for $1.99, 100 credits for $8.99  and on up.  [Prices are US dollars.] I decided this is very reasonable so I bought a favorite Chopin Nocturne for $.99. One Henle print edition Nocturne is about $7.00. The complete book of Chopin Nocturnes is 220 credits and the complete book of Bach Inventions is 94 credits. The purchases are through the Apple store, so Apple is getting 30% of the purchase price.

There are a few things that will improve the app. First, it really needs an eraser or undo in annotation mode. I tried the suggestion on their website of using the white pen tool to erase, and if your annotation is on top of a stave, the score is covered also. This was a real problem for me even though the original is not changed.  Also, the screen enlarges too much in annotation mode and it would be nice if that was adjustable.

I think most musicians from my generation love our print music books and I’m no exception. But it is nice having a digital library, and this is a great addition to my collection of apps.

[Disclosure: This is an un-solicited, non-commercial review. I have not been in contact with Henle in any way and received no compensation.]

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under iPad Ideas, Teaching Aids