Student Challenge Chart to Edit or Print by Hand

[Not Editable] Student Challenge Chart

[Personalize on your computer] Fillable Student Challenge Chart

Today I am posting two versions of a chart to make a list of students in your studio. I made two versions. The first one is blank so you can hand write your students’ names. The second one is editable in Adobe Reader. I use the editable one for my theory challenge because it is a really easy and fast way to make a student chart.

The dates and title of the chart can also be edited. I use the date of the beginning of each week because there is not enough room to add the month.

You can use this for any kind of studio-wide activity, such as a practice challenge, theory challenge, scale challenge, or sight reading challenge. It can be used for anything where you need a checklist or even to keep attendance or to assign music.  You can name the editable chart anything you wish and type anything that will fit into the text fields. If you can’t fit something in, you can change the size of the font. Be sure to delete “Student Name” (select>delete) if you have less than 21 students.

I hope you find these charts helpful!

Directions to Personalize the Chart

If you wish to change the font, color, and size, follow the directions below. You must use Adobe Reader DC which is free to  download from the web .  If you are having trouble opening this file in Adobe Reader, this link might help.

Directions for a PC

  • Download and save the PDF file. Open it in Adobe Reader DC.
  • Select the text you wish to edit.
  • Click Control E and the text properties box will open.
  • In the font box, you will be able to change the font, the color of the font, and the size of the font. You do not need to, however.

Directions for a Mac

  • Download and save the file. Open it in Adobe Reader DC. Do not use Preview.
  • Select the text you wish to edit.
  • Right click on the selected text.  A menu box will open. Select “Hyperlink.”
  • The Form Field Text Properties menu will open. Select Font to change the color and size, but you do not need to.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Please follow and like us:
Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
Pinterest
Pinterest

5 Comments

Filed under Teaching Aids, Teaching Business

Triad Trios – Identify Triads Inversions with Roman Numerals

Triad Trios

Triad Trios

Every time my intermediate students learn how to identify triads with Roman numerals, I remind myself that I need to make a fast activity that will make this easier and more fun. With the help of my students who tested it and made suggestions, I finally came up with this one which we named Triad Trios, because it only takes 3 cards in a column to win. It is a fast game for student and teacher.

Since this is an introductory activity, the key signature is C Major. I successfully used this with students who had no experience with the concept and they learned it much faster than when I simply explained it to a student with a worksheet.

I am a little hesitant about posting it here, however. Triad Trios is an easy game to explain in person, but I found it difficult to write the instructions. I’ve made some graphics that I hope will help. I suggest you print the instructions and save the with the cards.

I found this game to be fantastic in teaching a very hard concept and making it easy to learn. Teachers who prepare students for exams such as your state theory exam or ABRSM, as well as the AP music exam will find Triad Trios very helpful.

Objective

  • On the grand staff in the key of C major, identify I, IV, and V triads with the correct Roman numeral.
  • Use the correct Arabic numeral for inverted triads, using the bass note as the identifier.

Cards

  • Triad Trios uses only 9 cards per player, and is printed on front and back. You will make two sets, one for each player, using a different color for each set.
  • The file has 2 pages, but the second page is for the back of the cards.
  • Print only one page, then print on the back however your printer does that.
  • Alternately, instead of printing the second page on the back, which can be tricky, you can hand write the Roman numerals  on the back.
  • The purpose of the colored card stock is to quickly separate the decks. If you only have white card stock, mark them in some way.

Directions

  • This activity is for two players: student and teacher, or two students.
  • Each player has a deck of one color of cards. The “front” of the card show a triad on the staff. The back has the Roman numeral answer.
  • Each player has his deck on a table in front of him with the front of the cards (the grand staff side) facing up.
  • Before starting, explain that all the cards are in the key of C Major. Review the I, IV, and V chords in C.
  • Without turning the card over to see the back, the first player identifies the top card in his stack, saying, for example, I6 (one six). The player turns the card over to see the answer. Then he places it on the table with the answer (the back of the card) facing up.
  • The second player repeats this, and puts his card on the table also.
  • The play continues in this fashion. Every time a card is drawn it is placed on the table. The cards should be arranged in columns, so that all the Roman numeral I cards are in the first column, all the Roman IV cards are in the second column, and all the Roman numeral V cards are in the third column.
  • The first player who has all three inversions (I, I6, and I6/4 or IV, IV6, and IV6/4 OR V, V6 and V6/4) in a column is the winner.
  • Since I use this game as a teaching tool, there is no penalty if they get the answer wrong. I simply help them figure it out.

 

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

Please follow and like us:
Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
Pinterest
Pinterest

5 Comments

Filed under Intermediate Students, Texas State Theory Test, Theory

Triad Tic Tac Toe

Triad Tic Tac Toe

Triad Tic Tac Toe

Triad Tic Tac Toe is a set of four cards to review chords and chord inversions. This is a very fast, 2-person tic tac toe game for late elementary and intermediate students. Only one card is used in the game, so you can play at different levels for each student. It can be used for review, or as a teaching tool to explain as you play.

This game is like a worksheet, but a lot more fun.

There are four cards in this set. The first and second cards include inverted triads, and the third and fourth cards are in root position.

Have you ever noticed that some students can play inversions without any trouble, but they just sit and stare when you ask them to name the chord. There is no doubt that learning to quickly identify inversions is a great help in not only memorizing, but in learning theory, improvising, or playing lead sheets.

In this game there is a very simple way to name an inverted triad. All you have to do is find the interval of a 4th and the top note of this interval is the name of the chord.

Objectives

There are several things the student can identify with this game. Students can:

  1. Identify the root of the triad.
  2. Identify the inversion in cards one and two (first, second, root position).
  3. Name the chord using cards three and four.
  4. Identify the triad with Roman numerals. (Use the first card in C major because students need to know the key for this skill.)
  5. Identify the slash chord name, such as C/E. (Use the first and second cards.)
  6. Identify the triads as major or minor (if they know their key signatures).

Material:

  • Bingo tokens, 2 different colors.  [Pencil erasers, pieces of colored paper, bingo chips.]
  • Two players use the same game board.

Directions for 2 players:

  • Print one game board on card stock. The first and second cards are more difficult, so it depends on the skill you are working on.
  • Give each player about 5 tokens of the same color.
  • The student goes first and identifies a triad of his choice. If he/she is correct, he puts a token on it.
  • This is repeated by the second player, with a different colored token.
  • Play continues in this manner until a player has a token on 3 squares in a row in any direction, including diagonally, as in a Tic Tac Toe game.

 

Please follow and like us:
Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
Pinterest
Pinterest

5 Comments

Filed under Games, Texas State Theory Test, Theory, Uncategorized

Piano Camp 2017 with Marvin Blickenstaff

UPDATE: Due to the terrible hurricane and flooding in South Texas, Elizabeth Gutierrez, the director of Piano Camp for Piano Teachers, has extended the sale price to Sept. 4 and also included a way to help teachers in the South Texas area. Teachers have lost their music, their pianos, and who knows when they will be able to teach again.

A Message From Elizabeth:

“It is with such a heavy heart that I write all of you involved with Piano Camp for Piano Teachers or the Piano Teacher Academy. No doubt you have all seen the ongoing loss and devastation occurring in Houston/TX coastal areas with the catastrophic flood. And now, areas east of Austin are affected by river flooding. A few members of my family plus numerous friends and teaching colleagues are trapped in their homes or shelters either having lost everything or in some peril of losing their homes, belongings, livelihoods, etc. I want to do more than send personal donations. I want to try to contribute more substantially, especially to my TexasMTA colleagues who will need help in rebuilding their lives.

Tuesday, August 29 through Monday, Sept. 4 (midnight Central time), 10% of all net course sales at pianoteacheracademy.com will go to the MTNA Benevolence Fund.” 

Piano Camp 2017

Marvin Blickenstaff is one of the foremost experts in piano pedagogy today. He is such a gifted teacher and speaker, and he inspires others to greater heights in our own teaching. And he is always ready to share his knowledge with other teachers. Unfortunately only a small percentage of piano teachers have the opportunity to study with him or to attend one of his presentations.

He teaches in the most positive, encouraging, beautiful way. He tells a story, shares the history, paints a picture, evokes a feeling… so that by the time the student plays the piece again, it is utterly transformed. And so are we, the listeners. Marvin Blickenstaff is Magical. -Amy Barker, College Station, Tx. 

This year at Piano Camp in San Antonio, a small group of teachers was blessed with his presence. Many teachers want to hear inspiring teachers like Marvin, but do not have the opportunity.  This year the sessions were recorded, so it is as if we can all be there to learn and grow. Teachers from all over the world can experience what it is like to listen to one of our greatest living piano teaching experts. If you are ready to learn from a living legend, consider this course. Here is what a piano teacher said about Marvin Blickenstaff:

Read more on the Piano Camp Page.

This course is on sale until midnight, August. 31, 2017. Sept. 4, 2017. The investment for the Camp’s four sessions is only $127 (you can divide the payments up) and you will receive LIFETIME ACCESS to these sessions and the handouts.

Topics in the Course

Warm-Ups? Who, Me? Technical Routines for All Ages – by Marvin Blickenstaff (90 minutes)

Performance Practice Made Easy: Rules of Thumb for the Student – by Marvin Blickenstaff (82 minutes)

The End is in the Beginning: Coaching a Piece to Performance – by Marvin Blickenstaff (65 minutes)

A Simple Step-by-Step Start to Major Scales, All Without a Book – by Elizabeth Gutierrez (47 minutes)

Video Preview

Scroll down at this link to watch a special preview of Marvin reflecting on his collboration with educational composer, Lynn Freeman Olson. (10 minutes)

VIP Bundle On Sale!

In addition to the 2017 Piano Camp being on sale, for a short time you can also buy this course bundled with Sorting Out the Piano Classics, a very comprehensive course by Elizabeth Gutierrez who teaches how and when to teach piano classics. You can get both courses at an excellent sales price until midnight, August 31. Sept. 4, 2017 Split payments are available.

Hurry! The sale price is good only until August 31, Sept. 4, midnight. 

Get Both Courses On Sale

Marvin Blickenstaff is known among piano teachers throughout the country for his teaching, lecturing, performing, and publishing. Currently he maintains a private studio in the Philadelphia area and teaches at The New School for Music Study in Princeton. In 2007 he was named Fellow of the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto. He was honored in 2009 with MTNA’s highest award, the MTNA Achievement Award, and was selected in 2013 by the National Conference on Keyboard Pedagogy for its Lifetime Achievement Award.

Elizabeth Gutierrez has years of experience teaching piano, piano pedagogy, and piano literature to undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Texas at San Antonio. She has given numerous workshops and master classes to teachers around the globe and also as a national clinician for Faber Piano Adventures. For her workshops and online courses, she draws on her extensive background as an independent teacher, professor, performer, and composer/editor/author.

 

 

 

 

 

Please follow and like us:
Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
Pinterest
Pinterest

2 Comments

Filed under Teaching Aids, Teaching Business