Snowmen and Reindeer Games – Intervals

Here is the second game in a set of 3 Christmas games. This one is a review of intervals, thanks to a suggestion from another teacher.

Snowmen and Reindeer Rhythm Game

Students should be familiar with intervals from seconds to octaves or know how to count up the lines and spaces to identify intervals. The best way to learn intervals is to recognize the patterns of lines to spaces.  However, young children often forget this so I let them count the more difficult intervals until they can remember the patterns.

Sometimes I use this rhyme for 3rds: Line to line,  everything is fine. Space to space, everything is in its place.

Objective

  •  learn to identify intervals quickly by sight
  • review intervals from 2nds to octaves if the student already knows them
  • learn how to count lines and spaces to identify intervals
  • practice fine motor speed and coordination
  • quickly identify intervals under pressure
  • play a fun seasonal game in less than 3 minutes at an individual music lesson

Ages

  • Children, ages 7-10  who like cartoon graphics
  • Some younger children can play if given lots of time

Materials Needed

  • Printed game board and interval flash cards
  • Sand timer or stop watch
  • Bingo chips

Directions

Give the student a set of interval flash cards. Set the timer.  The student quickly draws a flash card and places a bingo chip on the corresponding interval degree.  The object is to cover all the interval degrees on the game board in the fastest time possible. Beginning students might enjoy a non-timed game better.

 

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5 Comments

Filed under Christmas, Games, Holiday Activities and Worksheets, Theory

5 Responses to Snowmen and Reindeer Games – Intervals

  1. Aleta

    Could you make a page of intervals using the bass clef? Or, no clef …
    Really, I’m sure I could find each of those, but sometimes students find it easy to play notes on treble, and freeze at bass clef. A beginner game could be with no clef, but they wouldn’t recognize all the intervals. But, it would take the intimidation out of the clef sign.
    Just a suggestion.
    AND, I DO LOVE ALL your games. Thanks for being such a giving person to share your resources!!!!!
    Blessings for a wonderful Holiday Season!

    • susanparadis

      Aleta,
      You’re welcome!

      Great idea and you are right about the bass clef.

      My beginners have had fun counting up to learn the intervals, but of course we want them to know them quickly. I’m planning on making some more interval cards and posting them in the new year. I’ll be sure to include bass staves.

  2. Once, again, you are amazing!

  3. yes! Just the thing for one of today’s students.

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