Tag Archives: Beginner music note names

One Minute Club 2015

One Minute Club Pack2015

One Minute Club 2015

It’s time to post the 2015 One Minute Club Cards! This year’s set also includes two certificates, including one for the Junior One Minute Club. the junior cards are yellow.  There is also a handy chart where you can keep a record of their scores. Just remember to keep it lighthearted and fun!

Below is a video I made several years ago showing students of all ages giving it a try!

One Minute Club from Susan Paradis on Vimeo.

These cards are formatted for 2 x 3.5  perforated blank business cards. The borders in the cards extend past the cutting lines to aid in printer alignment problems. Make sure your PDF printer window is set to “actual size,” and you are using the latest version of Adobe Reader.

In case you don’t have any blank business cards,  I added short cutting lines for you to connect and then cut using regular card stock.

After students earn the cards,  I put them in clear plastic ID holders and attach them to their  book bag with a small chain. The next year all I have to do is insert the new card.

The last several years, I’ve increased the way I use this card with students who can identify note names, but are slow playing them.

  1. I use mini flash cards printed in different colors for the treble and bass clef.
  2.  First, I show the student the card and I identify it for the student, saying Bass C, Middle C, etc. and the student plays the key.
  3. Then the student has to identify the card the same way but this time he doesn’t play.
  4. Then we do just the space notes the regular way. When those are mastered we go on to line notes.
  5. I review steps 1 to 3 at every lesson.
  6. I have individual goals for each student who will be given the Junior Club Cards. But I want every child to be able to do at least the cards around middle C.

If you’re reading this and have no idea what the One Minute Club is, well, I’ve written about it extensively. For more information, use the search tab on the right, and type in One Minute Club or follow this link for last year’s post.

 

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Filed under Certificates, Intermediate Students, Note Identification, Teaching Aids

Pre-Reading Music for Young Beginners Bundle

 

Beginners Music

Pre-reading Piano Set 1

Summer is winding down, school is starting back, and for piano teachers that often means new piano students. I remember when I was a classroom music specialist.  I had a guitar and students would wildly raise their hands to request their favorite songs and bob up and down with excitement. Children love music. So when piano students sit on my bench, I try for that same kind of enthusiasm. But piano is a lot harder for children, no doubt about it. What can I do to make them as enthused about piano lessons as they were when I pulled out my guitar for a sing-along? And can I share my ideas with other teachers around the globe? That is why I started this blog.

If you’re looking for some pre-reading music to use with your beginners, here are some old favorites of mine. They were originally made in landscape orientation, which allowed me to make the score larger. I’ve updated them, because parents kept telling me how hard it was to play sideways pages in a binder. I agree! So I am gradually revising all my pre-reading pieces from landscape (sideways) to portrait view. It takes a lot longer than you may think, which is why it is a gradual project. It is almost like starting over because I have to resize everything before I move it around.  But it is so much easier to use in a binder that it’s really worth it for my students. And in the spirit of sharing, I’m offering these to you, too.

If you want to see the landscape versions, go here to my old site, scroll down, and click the page numbers at the very bottom.

These pieces can be used at the first lesson, depending on age and ability,  and are appropriate for ages 4 to 7. All of them are on the black keys, which means students do not have to know the names of the keys. Only fingers 2, 3, and 4 are used. The two easiest ones are What the Robin Said to the Worm and What the Worm Said to the Robin.

The five pieces in this set are:

  • Red Light, Green Light – color coded to show which hand to use.
  • What the Robin Said to the Worm – No notes on this one, only finger numbers.
  • What the Worm Said to the Robin – This is the partner to the previous piece, using two fingers.
  • Hot Cross Buns – 2 pages, one for each hand on the black keys.

If you have some pre-reading favorite of mine that you would like me to re-do in portrait,  post the name of the piece in the comment section here, and I’ll put them at the top of my list!

Please follow my terms of use. I own the copyright. You may print these for private piano teaching or personal use. They may not be sold or redistributed by any means, including file sharing or posting on the internet. 

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Filed under Pre-reading, Preschool Music Resources

Pot of Gold Music Game

Pot of GoldPot of Gold

I’ve been testing out my new elementary level St. Patrick’s Day game, Pot of Gold, and it is fast and fun! It is a board game, where students answer a music question, roll a die,  and move their pawn.

This is a big file so it might take some time to download.  There are 8 pages, including 6 pages of elementary level cards: keyboards, notes, vocabulary, intervals, and key signatures. If you like to print a colorful back to your game cards so they look more professional, I included that, too. Scroll through all the pages included in this file and only print what you want. If you don’t know how to print the back to the cards, check out the FAQ at the top of my blog.

However, there is a little secret to this game. It is very much like my Thanksgiving game, Chasing the Turkey.  So if you have already printed the cards to that game and you are in a hurry or want to save ink, you can use the Chasing the Turkey cards.  I made this set of cards because I like to keep the game boards and cards together so I can find them quickly.

I printed the game board on card stock and laminated it, but I did not laminate the cards. I separate the cards by level before we play. I store board games in folders with pockets that I buy on sale at the beginning of the school year. On the inside of the folder, I glue the rules of the game because I forget the rules!

One of my older students was watching his brother as we played. “Hey, you’re giving him the answers,” he said. Then he quickly said, “But I guess if you don’t, he won’t learn anything.”

“You’re exactly right,” I said. The purpose of this game is to learn, and if he doesn’t know the answer, I help him out so he will!”

Objective

  • To review previously learned musical symbols, intervals, key signatures, the notes of middle C position, and some music vocabulary words.
  • To enjoy a seasonal game.

Ages

  • Grades 1-4, using the appropriate cards for the concepts students have learned.

Materials

  • Game board.
  • Cards printed with various musical symbols and terms.
  • One die.
  • On pawn for each player.

Directions

  • The game can be played with two or more players.
  • Print the game board and cut out the cards. 
  • Each player puts his token on the game board. The first player draws a card and answers the question. If he doesn’t know the answer, give him hints until he gets it correct.
  • Then he rolls the die and moves the number of spaces on the die. If he lands on a circle with instructions, he follows the instructions, such as taking a short cut, or moving back to Start.
  • The game continues in the same way with the other players.
  • When playing with a pre-school child, let him win most of the games so he will want to play again.
  • The first player to reach the Pot of Gold  is the winner.

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Filed under Games, Group lesson ideas, St. Patrick's Day, Texas State Theory Test, Theory

Animal Alphabet Clothespin Matching cards

Alphabet Clothpin MatchupAlphabet Clothespin Matching Cards

I’ve used the little animal characters I designed to create a matching game for students who are learning the note names around middle C. Students take a clothespin and clip it on the matching letter on the staff. It’s fun, and something a little different. It’s not hard but I think it’s a good way for younger students to practice learning note names. I also made a version for pre-readers using keyboards. If there is enough interest I’ll post it.

If is funny that some children don’t know what clothespins are. I tell them how I was the person in the house who had to carry the clothes out in the back and hang them on the clothesline. And I was the one who had to run out real fast and take them down if it started raining. Their eyes seem to get big like they are sitting in the presence of a true pioneer woman, especially when I tell them I remember finally getting a washing machine when I was a little girl. When I was real young we lived in a small city and the laundry man came around and got our dirty laundry. One student asked me if I remember when cars were invented!

There are 3 pages of cards. Print them on sturdy card stock and laminate. If you can’t laminate, and you want them to last, cover with clear plastic, such as clear Contact™ paper.

A few years ago I gave a baby shower and one of the games used little mini-clothes pins. I still have them, and I’m trying to think of some way to use them. But they were too small for my young students to use, so I went into my laundry room and got these. Laundry rooms are nice, but in a way I miss those simpler times when I spent the summer dashing out in the backyard to bring in the clothes!

Objective

  • To quickly identify the 9 notes around Middle C
  • To work on eye-hand coordination
  • To strengthen the fingers
  • To enjoy a hands-on activity

Ages

  • Children ages 5-8 who are learning to read note names

Materials

  • Regular size clothespins
  • Alphabet Clothespin Matching Cards, printed and cut out of card stock

Directions

  • This activity is for one student, but can be modified for more than one
  • The teacher gives the student the cards and a supply of clothespins
  • The object is to attach the clothes pin under the correct name of the note on the staff
  • As the students get better and know the notes, the game can be played with a timer

Why I like this game

  • It does not require a lot of preparation
  • It is fast and can be played in a few minutes
  • It is something a little different for students but they recognize the characters
  • It also helps to strengthen the fingers a little

 

 

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Filed under Games, Note Identification, Preschool Music Resources