Tag Archives: IPad

Fun With Frogs: Easy Notes on the Staff

Fun With Frogs Easy Notes on the Staff

Frog Notes on the Staff

Frog Treble and Bass Notes

I hope you didn’t give up on me posting the final set in the Fun With Frogs series. I was out-of-town several days, meeting all the wonderful teachers at the Texas Music Teachers Convention.   The Texas convention is huge and there was so much going on. I lost my iPad containing my presentations, found it, lost my iPhone, found it, and walked and talked a lot.

It was so exciting that my friend and teaching colleague Elizabeth Gutierrez won the TMTA pre-collegiate teacher of the year!

Speaking of Elizabeth, my next presentation is in San Antonio where I will speak at her Piano Camp for Piano Teachers. I’m going to open the iPad on-screen and show you how to use it. Elizabeth has some great sessions planned, like how to teach technique after the elementary level, the best classical pieces, and how to teach secure rhythm. Her students play so beautifully and polished, so I am looking forward to that.

Today’s post has piano worksheets for the notes around middle C position for young beginners. Print these sheets or open them in your iPad.

If you like these, you will probably like the others in the Frog series. These are all free downloads, because I just like to share!

Learning Piano Keys

Beginning Rhythm

Finger Numbers and Left/Right Hands

Frogs in Flip Flops – This 12-measure song uses only two notes, F and C. There are words and a teacher duet.

Below is something I did with my student to help him remember treble F. We had a lot of fun with Mr. Frog!

Mr Frog Learns F

 

 

 

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Filed under Group lesson ideas, iPad Ideas, Preschool Music Resources, Worksheets

Fun With Frogs: Piano Keys

Fun With Frogs:Piano Keys

Fun with Frogs: Piano Keys

Continuing with my series of beginning worksheets for printing and for the iPad, here are 3 more. This is to help young students learn the names of piano keys. If you are new here, check out my previous posts in this series.

  • Fingers and Hands (finger numbers, right and left hand)
  • Beginning Rhythm (learning beginning rhythm notes and includes UK vocabulary worksheets)
  • Tutorial for MetaMoji (I am not affiliated with this company but just happen to like this app for using worksheets on a mobile tablet)

These are high quality PDF documents that look good printed. Save ink and insert them into clear document covers and use over and over with a dry erase marker.

But they can also be downloaded on an iPad or any mobile tablet. You will need to download an app for writing on PDF documents and buy a stylus.

I like about MetaMoji Lite because it allows you keep these 3 pages in a file together so students can go page to page. This is unusual in a free document. In many free apps, each PDF page is a different file.

I have another page of frog worksheets for notes on the staff! I will post it soon.

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Filed under iPad Ideas, Music Printables, Preschool Music Resources, Worksheets

Made for the iPad: More Rhythm Notes

 

I’m gradually trying to add more to my Made for the iPad page. To find this page, go to the top menu bar and select “Free”, then “Newer Free Resources,” then “iPad Resources,” and you will see a collection of materials I use on my iPad. This is also how you can get to my old site. Just select “Older Resources.”

Today I am posting four more rhythm pages to draw on a mobile tablet.  Check out this post for more notes, and go here for a tutorial of a free, easy app to draw on worksheets with several mobile devices. According to the developer, the app works on an iPad, Android tablet, Kindle Fire, and Windows tablet, which is pretty amazing. [Disclosure: I am not affiliated with this app in any way and I discovered it by accident a few year ago.]

My iPad page is a work in progress.  If you are successfully using any of my material on your tablet, please email me with some feedback. Pictures are great, too!

Subscribe to this blog, “like” my page on Facebook, or follow me on Pinterest to keep up with new material.

Let’s Draw Dotted Half Notes

Let’s Draw Eighth Notes

Lets Draw 16th Notes

Let’s Draw Upside Down Notes

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Filed under iPad Ideas, Rhythm

MetaMoji Note – an app for writing on the iPad and other tablets

Today I want to share MetaMoji Note Lite (also known as Note Anytime). This PDF annotator is a snap to use and it has versions for the iPad, Kindle Fire, Windows, and Android tablets. On the MetaMoji site there is a list of the features that are in each version.

This app is great for anyone who wants to draw on a document, photo, or blank page. I particularly like how easy it is to open a PDF document in a lesson.

This tutorial is for the free iPad version.  [Disclosure: I received no  compensation for this review, I was not furnished the app, I have not communicated with the company, and these are my personal opinions.]

1. Download the app from iTunes on your iPad. You can also download it to your iPhone.

2. On today’s post, select this PDF file, Let’s Draw a Treble Clef, and open it on your iPad or iPhone.

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3. At the top right corner there will appear the words “Open in iBooks” and beside that, there will be the words “Open In…

Select  “Open In” and below that a tab will open up icons of all the apps on your iPad that can open PDF documents. Remember, just because your iPad lists all the apps that will open a PDF for you to read, it doesn’t mean that you can also write on the PDF. Scroll across until you get to the one that says “Open in Note” and select it.

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4. Now you will see a window that says “Import“.  Select “As New Note” and then select “Done“. The graphic below shows my PDF opened in MetaMoji Note Lite. Use the pinch gesture to drag the worksheet to make it larger.

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5. At the top you will see an icon that looks like a pencil. Select it and the lines that appear are the pen settings for the lines you will draw with your stylus or finger. Select one and hold it. Another small window will open and you can choose the color and thickness of your line. I chose the calligraphy pen with the two-tone color. Select “done”. Below you can see the lines I drew with the calligraphy pen using different colors.

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Now you are ready for your student to write on the worksheet!

When you finish, you can select the box with the arrow pointing up to see ways you can save this PDF. I usually don’t save my student’s work, but I do save the PDF to use again with another student. To see your saved PDF’s, select the folder in the top left of the tool bar.

Another great thing about this app is that you can open multi page PDF documents. There are not too many free PDF annotators that will do that.

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In the graphic above, I have labeled the tool bar, but it is really simple to use. The screen lock keeps the PDF from being written on. If you have an impulsive student who wants to start writing before you have explained something, keep the screen locked. The pencil tool is  for drawing and writing by hand. The eraser will erase all of your markings, but will not erase the original PDF. The lasso tool allows you to select something you have drawn and move it around the screen. This comes in handy if you have a PDF of a music staff  and you want to draw a note and move it around the screen. Your PDF will remain unchanged. The undo button will clear your PDF so you can use it again.

If you want a white board to write on without a PDF, select the save tool on the top left, and open a blank document. Then you can practice drawing any musical symbol without using paper. Click the + tool to see some pre-made art you can select. I used the heart icon on a blank staff as a note, and we moved it around naming the “note.”

What a PDF annotator will not do is allow you to cut and paste the original PDF.

There is a wrist guard on the bottom right of the screen that keep students from making accidental markings with their wrists. Simply grab it from the corner to enlarge it or flip it around.

This app has many other features that I am not going into. There are even more extra features in the paid version. At their website, you can view several short video tutorials to get started. I found this app so easy that I didn’t need the help features, but if you can get all kinds of support at their website. And you can always ask your students for help because they always seem to know how to use anything on the iPad!

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Filed under iPad Ideas