Tag Archives: IPad

Bunny Note Matching Printables in Color and Black & White

 

Bunny Notes

Bunny Note Matching Worksheets

Maybe you remember the Bunny Bass Notes that I posted several years ago. Well, evidently my short attention span got the better of me and I never made one for the treble notes.

So, recently I decided to complete the set.  While I was at it, I remade it from the ground up. I drew a new bunny, changed the fonts, and generally updated it. I also made black line (black and white) for those of you without color printers. My daughter tells me I should not say “black and white” because printers cannot print white. I know that, but old habits die slowly. So all you young whipper snappers, please don’t laugh at my old terminology. It dawned on me that some of my material is older (pre-Windows!) than the teachers who are using it! So I am going to continue to update my older material to bring it into the 21st century.

There are four pages, 2 in color and 2 in black line. Select the pages you want before you print them. If you don’t know how to do that, or if you have any trouble printing, please check out my FAQ’s above. 

These printables have big staves and a big type face,  so they are great for  younger students. To save on printing, I suggest you put them into page protectors and use dry erase markers so you only have to print one copy. You can store them in a binder for use next year. However, I tried to design them so they don’t use a lot of ink so we can use them in our students’  binders.

I’ve posted a lot of Easter material over the years. Go to the free section, select older free resources, and start scrolling! You can also do a search on this page to find older material. There are hundreds of free printables of all kinds you can select from. Thank you so much for your very kind donations that help so much with the expenses for hosting this site!

Enjoy!

4 Comments

Filed under Easter, Holiday Activities and Worksheets, Music Printables, Note Identification

Funny Thanksgiving Food – B&W and Color

Funny Thanksgving Food 648x648

Funny Thanksgiving Food Bundle

Maybe some of you are taking a trip on Thanksgiving, and want something to keep your children busy when they get tired of movies and computer games. There are also some home school Moms who can use this in a music lesson next week.

The printables I’m posting today are old, so if you have been following my blog for a while, you recognize them. After one reader alerted me on Facebook that the link was wrong in my Thanksgiving Round Up post, I decided to freshen them up and put them all together in one PDF for you. There are two versions, one for learning piano keys, and the other has the easier notes around middle C on the staff. Each one comes in B&W and color.

The pages in color were not meant to be printed out, but to be used on an iPad or Android. There are several child-friendly PDF annotating apps you can download for your device, such as Skitch, Jot, and Good Notes

However, if you want to print the color versions out, I suggest you print out just one copy of each. Put them into sheet protectors, and store them in a binder. Use page dividers to keep all the different printables organized, such as Thanksgiving, Christmas, Rhythm, etc. Use a dry erase marker on the printables, and you can use them over and over. If you leave the writing on the page too long it will not erase very well, so be sure to erase the marks before the end of the day. I got this tip from a teacher’s comment on my blog, and I think it’s a great way to save ink!

For those of you who do not know print out just one page of a PDF document, take at look at my FAQ here. Scroll down the page to find “How to Print on Both Sides of Flash Cards.” I give instructions on how to print just one page. If you want to know how to use Jot on your iPad, I wrote a tutorial here.

Disclosure: I was not compensated for the Jot tutorial, and I bought the Jot app myself. The free version of Jot will not work for this purpose. However, Skitch and the free version of Good Notes will work. If you want to save more than a couple of files on Good Notes, you will have to get the paid version. Skitch is a useful free app.

The black and white version is also fun to color on the iPad if you work one-on-one with a preschool child. If you find these iPad worksheets helpful, and want more, let me know!

 

1 Comment

Filed under Thanksgiving

Jot! A Great iPad App for Education

Jot_2

Jot! An iPad App

I’ve noticed a lot of piano teachers have iPads. I see them at conventions typing away on their tablets while I’m still trying to find a pen in my purse as I remember that I left my paper back in the room. So I take scribbled notes in the margins of the presenters handouts. I have files of scribbled notes with very wise sayings from some of the great presentations I’ve been fortunate enough to attend. I think I’m rambling, so I’ll get right to the point.

Jot! [$4.99] is a white board app for the iPad, iPhone, and iPod, and I think it’s a fine app to use with older elementary students. It’s easy to learn, quick to set up in a piano lesson, and simple enough for even me to use.

After you download the app from the Apple app store and open it, there is a page to show you how to use it. You will need to refer to this later.

Once the app is installed, it is easy to use with any PDF printable. Here is how to open one of my documents.

Open up my website on your iPad. It’s faster for me to use www.susanparadis.com  but you can use my WordPress blog, too. Follow the links until you get to “download PDF document“. Select it, and it will open on your iPad. Turn your iPad in the same orientation as my printable. This is important. Most of the material I use on the iPad is in landscape orientation, so turn your iPad to the horizontal (landscape) position if the PDF is also in landscape.

Touch the top right corner of your iPad, and the words “Open In” will magically appear. Select, and a pop-up box will appear with an icon of every app on your iPad that will open a PDF document. If you do not see Jot, go to the second or third page by using the tiny buttons on the bottom of the box. Select “Open in Jot!” (You have to have iOS 6 installed or it will not show up.)

Now comes the only hard part of Jot. On the next screen there is a pop-up box that says “Background.” You will see a mini version of my printable. Using your fingers, drag it to fit inside the even smaller red rectangle. It doesn’t have to be perfect, but get it all inside. Any part that is not inside the red box will not show up in Jot! Obviously the guys who made this app are not used to granny eyes!

Click done, and the printable will open and you can draw on it. You can still adjust the size by using the two finger iPad gesture to stretch it bigger.

The menu is on the right side if you are in landscape orientation. Select the squiggly line, a color, and draw away. You can adjust the size of the drawing line. Try out the other boxes and notice you can draw shapes.

There is an undo selection, a way to save documents or send them to parents, and best of all, an eraser. If you press hard on whatever you draw, you can move it around the screen without changing the PDF background. That comes in handy if you want to draw whole notes and move them around the staff.

There is a free version of Jot, so you can try it out. [Edited: This tutorial does not work with the free version, but the free version can give you an idea of how it works. Also, you can take a screen shot of a PDF and use that in the free version.} It is supported by advertisements, which distract me, so I upgraded to the paid version, and it was worth it.

There are other interesting things you can do in Jot, such as real-time drawing collaboration. You can share your document in real-time with users on the internet.  Students can do worksheets on their iPad at home while you watch back in your studio, just as if they were sitting beside you. I have not been organized enough to try that out yet!

I would like to be clear that I do not find writing with a stylus or a finger on a tablet easy for younger children in the  limited time session of a piano lesson. I think it is better for younger children to use hands on activities and not writing on a computer tablet. Jot is better with children over 8 years old. However, parents who have the time to sit and work with their child and guide them will have a better experience.

Disclosure: This review is my opinion after using Jot! for almost a year. I was not paid and I did not receive compensation in any form.  My review was not solicited, nor do the developers know I am writing this review. I discovered Jot! in the app store and bought it after using the free version for several months.

Jot_1

8 Comments

Filed under iPad Ideas, Music Reviews, Teaching Aids

I Can Count Rhythm – a Beginning Worksheet

I Can Count RhythmsI Can Count Rhythm

Today I am posting the second worksheet in my “I Can” series for young beginners. My last post was I Can Write the Music Alphabet. The one I am posting today reviews rhythm. I think that it is also big enough to use on the iPad.

As with all of my worksheets, this is free for personal use. In order to print, click on the picture or the link below the picture. That will take you to another page, where you will select “download”.

I am working on a worksheet like this for rests, so hold on and I’ll post it this week. Meanwhile, don’t forget these fun rhythm games for the younger set: Quarter Note Hunt, Fish Rhythm Matching CardsRhythm Round About, and Counting Up the Mountain. Average age beginners will learn rhythm values quickly with the black ink Rhythm Memory Game.

If you use all of these games with your beginning students, they will probably learn rhythm note values very easily!

12 Comments

Filed under Preschool Music Resources, Rhythm, Texas State Theory Test, Worksheets

I Can Write the Music Alphabet Worksheet

ICanWriteMusicAlphabetI Can Write the Music Alphabet

I love to make theory worksheets for my students! Just a little bit of color makes them so much more fun for students.

This worksheet is for beginning students who are learning the music alphabet. I made it with large, easy to read print for younger children. The larger print also makes it possible to use this on your iPad with older beginners who can write smaller. You will have to experiment because pre-children vary a lot in their ability to write on the iPad.

All my printables are free for personal use. In order to print, click on the picture or the link below the picture. That will take you to another page, where you will select “download”.

I am making a series of these larger worksheets for my younger students. I will post more as I have time. I hope you enjoy them!

12 Comments

Filed under iPad Ideas, Preschool Music Resources, Teaching Business, Theory, Worksheets