Tag Archives: learning piano keys

LadyBug Game Revised

LadyBugGame

Lady Bug Game Board

LadyBug Game Cards

This is one of my favorite games. It’s fast and fun and I think it’s a good game to play this time of year. I’ve revised it and remade the keyboard cards.

Game Board

  • I suggest printing the colorful game board on photo paper and then laminating it so the colors really come to life. It can also be taken to an office shop. MTNA members, use Office Depot/Max and receive a big discount.

Cards

  • Before you print the cards, decide which pages you want to use. Please don’t print all the pages at once because the last page is the optional backs.
  • Print on card stock. They do not have to be laminated.
  • There are 5 pages of cards.
  • Pages 1-3 are notes on the staff.
  • Page 4 has keyboard cards.
  • Page 5 is the optional back of the cards. After printing the cards on pages 1-4,  insert the pages back into your printer to print the back of the cards. Please see my FAQ for a tutorial on how to do this.

Directions

  • This game can be played with students or teacher and student.
  • Each player has a token.
  • The cards are placed face down next to the game board.
  • The first player draws a card and moves their token forward along the path to the closest letter that matches the note on their card.
  • The next player draws and moves in the same way.
  • The game is over when someone draws a card that takes them to the last G or any note after the last G at the end of the path.
  • There are many games you can play with this game board.  Use your own ideas and I hope you have fun!

Objectives

  • To learn the music alphabet.
  • To learn to recognize notes on the grand staff or keys on a piano keyboard.
  • To reinforce learning steps and skips.

Ages

  • Early childhood and elementary ages.

Why I like this game

  • It’s fast, under 3 minutes, students always like it.
  • Children learn faster if they are having fun.
  • It’s a great game for beginners to learn piano key names.
  • The game is so fast, you can play more than once.

 

2 Comments

Filed under Games, Group lesson ideas, Music Printables, Note Identification, Preschool Music Resources

St. Patrick’s Day Beginning Composing

 

St Patrick's Day Composing

St Patrick’s Day Composing

In my never-ending quest to change everything on my website to portrait orientation, I have updated these two St. Patrick’s Day composing pages and put them together into one PDF file. It’s time-consuming, which is why it is taking me so long!

The first page is for composing on the staff.  I wrote a little poem and put the rhythm above the staff. The student can write a melody with bass notes, or just the melody.

The pre-reading page has the rhythm written above shamrocks, and they write the finger numbers of their melody on the shamrocks.

I always suggest to my students  to start and end on the same note if they want a singable melody and I suggest D using only white keys for an Irish sounding melody.  It is always amazing to me that some students have an innate ability to come up with a good melody! Other students write notes willy-nilly here and there and it sounds rather like me composing 12-tone music for a theory class. 🙂

Some students want to compose melody and accompaniment, so I suggest they start with fifths in the left hand and use D minor and C parallel fifths. If they get carried away and want to expand their composition, check out the staff paper I’ve posted that has a braced grand staff, measures, and bar lines. It’s one of the pages in this bundle.  Staff Paper Variety Pack

Staff Paper Variety Pack

If you don’t know how to print only one page in a PDF bundle, there is a tutorial in my FAQ.

5 Comments

Filed under Composing Activities, Preschool Music Resources, St. Patrick's Day

Shamrock Keyboard Race

Shamrock Keyboard Race

Shamrock Keyboard Race

This is a game I made up to learn piano keys. I got the idea from my friend Cecilly who told me about her similar game to learn sharps and flats. I changed it around for learning piano keys, made some cards, and it kind of took on a life of its own!  It has become a staple for piano teachers all around the world.

Keyboard Race is played on the piano keys. It’s fast and it works!  As a matter of fact, I like it so much that I’ve made a lot of different variations for each season and even baseball cards! I’ve even made cards with an H instead of a B for German teachers.  Check out the links at the bottom of this page.

Since these cards are not particularly cutesy, they are good for older beginners.

Objective

  • To quickly identify piano keys
  • To identify middle C
  • Optional: To identify B flat and F sharp

Materials

  • Piano keyboard
  • Keyboard Race Cards, one color for each player
  • Two tokens • Collectable erasers will not damage your keyboard and I have an extensive collection of cute erasers.

Directions

  • This is a two-player game, usually the teacher and student.
  • The teacher sits on the right side and the students sits on the left side of the piano bench, at each end of the piano.
  • Each player has one set of cards and one token, and places the their cards on the piano book rack. Shuffle the cards well.
  • The first player turns a card and moves his token to that piano key, the closest to his end of the piano.  The second player does the same.
  • Play continues with each player drawing a card and moving his token toward the middle of the keyboard.
  • The game is over when one player passes the middle of the keyboard. I like to use middle C with my young students.
  • Note: The player on the right side (treble end) usually loses, so that’s where I sit. Games are more fun for students if they win.

Why I like this game

  • My students love it and want to play it over and over.
  • It is the fastest and most fun way to learn keyboard names.

Here are links to the game using different cards:

Baseball Keyboard Race

Pumpkin or Leaves Keyboard Race

Snowflake Keyboard Race

Reindeer and Elves Keyboard Race

German Shamrock Keyboard Race

If any of these links don’t work in the future, use the search engine on the right. A Google search will produce results, also.

 

1 Comment

Filed under Note Identification, St. Patrick's Day, Teaching Aids

Fun With Frogs: Piano Keys

Fun With Frogs:Piano Keys

Fun with Frogs: Piano Keys

Continuing with my series of beginning worksheets for printing and for the iPad, here are 3 more. This is to help young students learn the names of piano keys. If you are new here, check out my previous posts in this series.

  • Fingers and Hands (finger numbers, right and left hand)
  • Beginning Rhythm (learning beginning rhythm notes and includes UK vocabulary worksheets)
  • Tutorial for MetaMoji (I am not affiliated with this company but just happen to like this app for using worksheets on a mobile tablet)

These are high quality PDF documents that look good printed. Save ink and insert them into clear document covers and use over and over with a dry erase marker.

But they can also be downloaded on an iPad or any mobile tablet. You will need to download an app for writing on PDF documents and buy a stylus.

I like about MetaMoji Lite because it allows you keep these 3 pages in a file together so students can go page to page. This is unusual in a free document. In many free apps, each PDF page is a different file.

I have another page of frog worksheets for notes on the staff! I will post it soon.

4 Comments

Filed under iPad Ideas, Music Printables, Preschool Music Resources, Worksheets