Tag Archives: music games

Pot of Gold Music Game

Pot of GoldPot of Gold

I’ve been testing out my new elementary level St. Patrick’s Day game, Pot of Gold, and it is fast and fun! It is a board game, where students answer a music question, roll a die,  and move their pawn.

This is a big file so it might take some time to download.  There are 8 pages, including 6 pages of elementary level cards: keyboards, notes, vocabulary, intervals, and key signatures. If you like to print a colorful back to your game cards so they look more professional, I included that, too. Scroll through all the pages included in this file and only print what you want. If you don’t know how to print the back to the cards, check out the FAQ at the top of my blog.

However, there is a little secret to this game. It is very much like my Thanksgiving game, Chasing the Turkey.  So if you have already printed the cards to that game and you are in a hurry or want to save ink, you can use the Chasing the Turkey cards.  I made this set of cards because I like to keep the game boards and cards together so I can find them quickly.

I printed the game board on card stock and laminated it, but I did not laminate the cards. I separate the cards by level before we play. I store board games in folders with pockets that I buy on sale at the beginning of the school year. On the inside of the folder, I glue the rules of the game because I forget the rules!

One of my older students was watching his brother as we played. “Hey, you’re giving him the answers,” he said. Then he quickly said, “But I guess if you don’t, he won’t learn anything.”

“You’re exactly right,” I said. The purpose of this game is to learn, and if he doesn’t know the answer, I help him out so he will!”

Objective

  • To review previously learned musical symbols, intervals, key signatures, the notes of middle C position, and some music vocabulary words.
  • To enjoy a seasonal game.

Ages

  • Grades 1-4, using the appropriate cards for the concepts students have learned.

Materials

  • Game board.
  • Cards printed with various musical symbols and terms.
  • One die.
  • On pawn for each player.

Directions

  • The game can be played with two or more players.
  • Print the game board and cut out the cards. 
  • Each player puts his token on the game board. The first player draws a card and answers the question. If he doesn’t know the answer, give him hints until he gets it correct.
  • Then he rolls the die and moves the number of spaces on the die. If he lands on a circle with instructions, he follows the instructions, such as taking a short cut, or moving back to Start.
  • The game continues in the same way with the other players.
  • When playing with a pre-school child, let him win most of the games so he will want to play again.
  • The first player to reach the Pot of Gold  is the winner.

13 Comments

Filed under Games, Group lesson ideas, St. Patrick's Day, Texas State Theory Test, Theory

Search and Find Bass G

Search and Find BassG

 

Search and Find Bass G

Well, I’m getting to the end of this series, and I have to say I am running out of ways to say the same thing. So please bear with me as I repeat the same thing!

This is the eighth printable in a series of “Search and Find” games. I have already posted Search and Find Middle CSearch and Find DSearch and Find E,  Search and Find F, and Search and Find (treble) GSearch and Find bass A, and Search and Find Bass B.  Rather than post the directions and objectives again, new readers can go here for Search and Find C and read up on how to play.

Coming up this week I will post the last Search and Find, and the really easy 2 note song for the note B.

 

1 Comment

Filed under Games, Note Identification, Preschool Music Resources

Whole Step Half Step Game

 

Whole Step Half Step Game

This is the time of year when students learn about whole and half steps so they can construct scales, which is a requirement for many theory tests.

If you have ever used little tokens or figures on the keyboard to construct scales and noticed it was confusing to some students, I think you will find placing the W’s and H’s behind the keys is a big help.

This has turned out to be a great success for my “hands on” learners, as well as students who have trouble understanding the entire concept of scales. Students who were very frustrated with  theory worksheets quickly caught on using manipulatives and these cards I designed to be placed behind the keys.

I made many sizes and styles of cards before I settled on this design. I wanted the cards to be big enough for children to handle, but small enough to see the W and H when placed behind the piano keys.

I am so happy to report how much it has helped my students who were confused. My philosophy is that if they don’t understand what you are teaching, change the way you teach. The student is not going to change!

You can use these cards in a game or simply as a way to visually show scale patterns. Be sure to use sturdy card stock and laminate the cards so they will stand up behind the keys. For major scales, consider using the sentence “We Were Happy When We Were Home.” I’ve noticed my students and I say this continually as we play. All the W’s and H’s are hard to remember, especially for some students.

The inexpensive, colorful pencil erasers in the photo above can be bought in bulk this time of year. Go look now while all the school supply material is on sale.  I bought a large pack years ago and  I use them all the time, especially with an older child who who might be insulted with all the cute toys I have collected. They are also good for the easily distracted child, or the child who takes 5 minutes to decide if they want a kitty or a puppy.

I am posting some of the ways I use these cards, but I would like to emphasize that after you have tried them, adapt the activities to fit your needs. If you have a better idea, please leave a comment. My students have really enjoyed learning scales this way, and I hope yours do too!

Material

  • Whole Step Half Step free printable from my website, cut into individual cards
  • Pencil erasers to use as game tokens
  • Piano keyboard
  • Optional: W W H W W W H written on a chart for student reference

Directions for playing as a game with two players

  • There are two color backgrounds, making it easy to separate the cards for two players. Each player receives 8 cards of one color. However, when I play against a student, I often do not give myself a “wild card” because students really enjoy winning and love to beat me.
  • Place the cards on the piano book stand, with the blank side up.
  • Decide which scale you are going to construct. C major is  good because the half steps are so easy to see.
  • Both players put an eraser (or token) on the first note of the scale.
  • Player one draws a card. If it is a “W”, place it behind the D on the piano keyboard, because that is the first whole step. The student also places a token on the D key. The first whole step has been completed.
  • If the player draws an “H”, the player discards the card by putting it in the back of his stack on the piano stand. No token is placed on the piano.
  • If a “Wildcard” is drawn, the student can place it aside to use later and draw again, or he can use the wild card immediately. The wild card can be turned upside down to be either a “half” or “whole” step.
  • The second player then draws and plays in the same manner as above.
  • Play continues between the players. The game is over when one player completes a major scale.
  • An alternate version for younger students is to let the student (but not the teacher) draw again if they draw the wrong card. Obviously the objective is to learn how to construct the scale, not for the teacher to win.

Directions for other ways to use the cards

  • With one player, the student draws all the cards, continuing until a scale is completed. This is a good way to explain how to construct scales to beginners.
  • The cards can also be used to simply explain whole and half steps, placing the cards and erasers randomly on the piano keyboard and not constructing a scale.
  • In a group lesson, 3 or more players can play. You will need to print out more cards.
  • Younger children love to use my collectible erasers of cute animals instead of the erasers in the picture above.

Objectives

  • To learn how to construct major or natural minor scales.
  • To learn half and whole steps on the piano keyboard.

Ages

  • Elementary to middle school, depending on the scale and the student’s abilities.

Why I like this activity

  • There is only one page to cut out!
  • It is colorful and students like color.
  • Students like the games and activities we use with these cards.
  • Students tell me the WWHWWWH cards really help to understand how to write scales.
  • When we get to natural minor scales, a light bulb comes on as they change the order of whole and half steps.
  • It really works.

I wish

  • I wish I had room on the printable to add a  “step+half step” card to construct harmonic minor scales.
  • I wish I had made a matching WWHWWWH chart.
  • I wish I could remember the sentence for the natural minor scale pattern! Can anyone help me?

28 Comments

Filed under Games, Group lesson ideas, Steps and Skips, Texas State Theory Test

Hearts and Clubs – Keyboards

Hearts and Clubs – Keyboards

A few readers wondered if I had some keyboard cards to use with the Hearts and Club Note game I posted last week. As a matter of fact, I did, but I was having a problem with what to do with the extra space on the page. I just hate to leave a space blank!

Jennifer Fox suggested I use an empty keyboard, similar to the Fly Keyboard cards, so that is what I did. You can either use it as a wild card, or take a red marker and make it whatever key you wish. Or use it for your student to draw the letters on the keys.If it is laminated, you can use it reuse it next year.

In order to play this game, you will have to use the game board for the Hearts and Club Note game. You will also find the rules for the game on that post. All you need to do is modify the game for use with the keyboard cards. You can also use these cards as flash cards, if you don’t want to play the game. And don’t forget the famous “run up to the piano and play this card as fast as you can” game!

9 Comments

Filed under Games, Holiday Activities and Worksheets, Preschool Music Resources, Valentine's Day

Valentine Rhythm Hunt

Valentine Rhythm Hunt

I made this last year, using a variation of a game idea from Cecilly. All of my younger students played it at their private lesson the week of Valentine’s. They liked it so much we also played it at our performance class.

Students should be familiar with the rhythm names of notes. If they are beginners and are not secure in the names yet, use the game as a way to teach rhythm identification. It is a fast way to learn the names of notes.

Objective

  • review rhythm note names by sight
  • quickly identify rhythms under pressure
  • play a fun, seasonal game in less than 3 minutes

Ages

  • Younger children, ages 5-8

Materials Needed

  • Printed Valentine rhythm cards, cut and folded, but not laminated
  • stop watch or mobile phone timer

Directions

Print and cut out these Valentine rhythm cards and fold to make a tent card. Before your student arrives, place the cards around the room with the heart side facing out. Call out a rhythm value, such as “quarter note,” and start the timer. Have your student quickly find all the notes of that value. If you have time, your students can hunt for other note values. Depending on the age of the students, don’t hide them too carefully or they will not be able to find them! It is so much fun to watch them quickly run around the room looking for notes!

Children love this game. It can be used at an individual lesson or with a group. For a non-seasonal version of the same game, see Cecilly’s game, Quarter Note Hunt.

3 Comments

Filed under Games, Holiday Activities and Worksheets, Preschool Music Resources, Rhythm, Valentine's Day