Category Archives: Teaching Aids

Make a List of Music Students Have Learned

Chart for 40 Piece Challenge

Music I Have Learned

Today I am sharing a chart your students can use to make a list of the music they have learned. My friend Marcia is doing a 30 Piece Challenge and she thought it would be helpful to have a chart for each student to list the name of the pieces they have learned. So I made one up to match the other balloon-themed material I’ve posted this year, such as the academic calendar and the freebie Key Signature Chart that is a test product in my store.

I created this file as an editable PDF, but only the title is editable, so you can use it for anything and call it anything you wish as long as the title fits in the space. To edit the form, simply click on the title and type over the text with whatever you wish the chart to be called. For example, you can title it “Scales I Know” and have students keep a list of the scales they have learned. Put it in your student’s binder and you’re good to go! I made it with space to list 40 items so it will work with the 40 Piece Challenge.

Have you heard of the 40 Piece Challenge? This is an idea thought up and shared by the imaginative piano composer, blogger, and piano instructor from Australia, Elissa Milne. You can read all about it here.

I first heard about Elissa’s idea at a MTNA convention about 3 years ago. Students set a goal to learn 40 pieces each year instead of only practicing the same several difficult pieces the entire year, neglecting easier pieces that help with sight reading and make piano more interesting and educational. The music doesn’t have to be memorized or polished to perfection like a competition piece. Now that her idea has spread all around the world, teachers with a shorter teaching schedule have tweaked it to require only 30 pieces.

To find all the material I’ve posted this year that matches this chart, select “Free” in the top menu. When the page opens, select “Teaching Aids” and start scrolling down to find the matching pages. There is a lot of material there!

 

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Student Challenge Chart to Edit or Print by Hand

[Not Editable] Student Challenge Chart

[Personalize on your computer] Fillable Student Challenge Chart

Today I am posting two versions of a chart to make a list of students in your studio. I made two versions. The first one is blank so you can hand write your students’ names. The second one is editable in Adobe Reader. I use the editable one for my theory challenge because it is a really easy and fast way to make a student chart.

The dates and title of the chart can also be edited. I use the date of the beginning of each week because there is not enough room to add the month.

You can use this for any kind of studio-wide activity, such as a practice challenge, theory challenge, scale challenge, or sight reading challenge. It can be used for anything where you need a checklist or even to keep attendance or to assign music.  You can name the editable chart anything you wish and type anything that will fit into the text fields. If you can’t fit something in, you can change the size of the font. Be sure to delete “Student Name” (select>delete) if you have less than 21 students.

I hope you find these charts helpful!

Directions to Personalize the Chart

If you wish to change the font, color, and size, follow the directions below. You must use Adobe Reader DC which is free to  download from the web .  If you are having trouble opening this file in Adobe Reader, this link might help.

Directions for a PC

  • Download and save the PDF file. Open it in Adobe Reader DC.
  • Select the text you wish to edit.
  • Click Control E and the text properties box will open.
  • In the font box, you will be able to change the font, the color of the font, and the size of the font. You do not need to, however.

Directions for a Mac

  • Download and save the file. Open it in Adobe Reader DC. Do not use Preview.
  • Select the text you wish to edit.
  • Right click on the selected text.  A menu box will open. Select “Hyperlink.”
  • The Form Field Text Properties menu will open. Select Font to change the color and size, but you do not need to.

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Piano Camp 2017 with Marvin Blickenstaff

Piano Camp 2017

Marvin Blickenstaff is one of the foremost experts in piano pedagogy today. He is such a gifted teacher and speaker, and he inspires others to greater heights in our own teaching. And he is always ready to share his knowledge with other teachers. Unfortunately only a small percentage of piano teachers have the opportunity to study with him or to attend one of his presentations.

He teaches in the most positive, encouraging, beautiful way. He tells a story, shares the history, paints a picture, evokes a feeling… so that by the time the student plays the piece again, it is utterly transformed. And so are we, the listeners. Marvin Blickenstaff is Magical. -Amy Barker, College Station, Tx. 

This year at Piano Camp in San Antonio, a small group of teachers was blessed with his presence. Many teachers want to hear inspiring teachers like Marvin, but do not have the opportunity.  This year the sessions were recorded, so it is as if we can all be there to learn and grow. Teachers from all over the world can experience what it is like to listen to one of our greatest living piano teaching experts. If you are ready to learn from a living legend, consider this course. Here is what a piano teacher said about Marvin Blickenstaff:

Read more on the Piano Camp Page.

This course is on sale until midnight, August. 31, 2017. Sept. 4, 2017. The investment for the Camp’s four sessions is only $127 (you can divide the payments up) and you will receive LIFETIME ACCESS to these sessions and the handouts.

Topics in the Course

Warm-Ups? Who, Me? Technical Routines for All Ages – by Marvin Blickenstaff (90 minutes)

Performance Practice Made Easy: Rules of Thumb for the Student – by Marvin Blickenstaff (82 minutes)

The End is in the Beginning: Coaching a Piece to Performance – by Marvin Blickenstaff (65 minutes)

A Simple Step-by-Step Start to Major Scales, All Without a Book – by Elizabeth Gutierrez (47 minutes)

Video Preview

Scroll down at this link to watch a special preview of Marvin reflecting on his collboration with educational composer, Lynn Freeman Olson. (10 minutes)

VIP Bundle On Sale!

In addition to the 2017 Piano Camp being on sale, for a short time you can also buy this course bundled with Sorting Out the Piano Classics, a very comprehensive course by Elizabeth Gutierrez who teaches how and when to teach piano classics. You can get both courses at an excellent sales price until midnight, August 31. Sept. 4, 2017 Split payments are available.

Hurry! The sale price is good only until August 31, Sept. 4, midnight. 

Get Both Courses On Sale

Marvin Blickenstaff is known among piano teachers throughout the country for his teaching, lecturing, performing, and publishing. Currently he maintains a private studio in the Philadelphia area and teaches at The New School for Music Study in Princeton. In 2007 he was named Fellow of the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto. He was honored in 2009 with MTNA’s highest award, the MTNA Achievement Award, and was selected in 2013 by the National Conference on Keyboard Pedagogy for its Lifetime Achievement Award.

Elizabeth Gutierrez has years of experience teaching piano, piano pedagogy, and piano literature to undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Texas at San Antonio. She has given numerous workshops and master classes to teachers around the globe and also as a national clinician for Faber Piano Adventures. For her workshops and online courses, she draws on her extensive background as an independent teacher, professor, performer, and composer/editor/author.

 

 

 

 

 

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Personalize a Grand Staff Binder Cover

2017 Binder Cover

Today I am posting a grand staff binder cover for you to personalize and use on your students’ binders. It has the notes of the grand staff on the front and it matches the studio calendar that I recently posted. What I am really excited about is that I think this is the first time I’ve posted a PDF file where you can change the font!

Not only can you type a name and title of the binder, but if you have some computer knowledge, you can change the font, the color, and the size of the text.

If the directions below are too challenging for you, open the file in Adobe Reader DC, select “Your Text” and type over my text. [If you want to remove the text on this page, select Your Text, delete it, and print. The large light blue box you see will not print.]

If you wish to change the font, color, and size, follow the directions below. You must use Adobe Reader DC which is free to  download from the web .  If you are having trouble opening this file in Adobe Reader, this link might help.

Directions for a PC

  • Download and save the PDF file. Open it in Adobe Reader DC. (To change the font, you cannot just click and open the file as usual.)
  • Select Your Text.
  • Click Control E and the text properties box will open.
  • In the font box, you will be able to change the font, the color of the font, and the size of the font.

Directions for a Mac

  • Download and save the file. Open it in Adobe Reader DC. Do not use Preview. (To change the font, you cannot just click and open the file as usual.)
  • Select Your Text.
  • Right click on the selected text.  A menu box will open. Select “Hyperlink.” [There is supposed to be a keyboard shortcut, but I don’t know what it is.]
  • The Form Field Text Properties menu will open. Select Font.
  • You can change the font, the color of the font, and the size of the font.

*If you try a font on you computer that will not print, try another more common one. There are some fonts that you might not be able to use due to licensing and embedding, that sort of thing. If you have a font that works well, please share it with us!

 

 

 

 

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