Category Archives: Thanksgiving

Golden Oldie: Save the Turkey

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Save the Turkey Set 1

Save the Turkey Set 2

Save the Turkey Intermediate

Save the Turkey_Keyboard Version

I tell students that whoever draws the turkey will save it from being turned into Thanksgiving dinner!

Save the turkey is an old favorite fast and fun game that students of all ages enjoy. There are cards for all levels of students, from children who are learning piano keys, to older students who should know all the key signatures! I am reposting the directions to this free game today along with links to print the cards. This is one of those games that is so easy I always forget how to play it. So be sure and print the directions and pack them away with the cards so you can play it next year. That is what I have to do!

Directions to Save the Turkey

Shuffle the cards and put them in a stack on the table. The Skip a Turn cards should be evenly distributed.

Be sure the “turkey” card is not near the top.

The student (player 1) draws a card and identifies the symbol. As long as they answer the card correctly, they continue to draw until they draw a Skip a Turn card. Then the teacher (player 2) does the same thing.

The teacher may answer the card correctly or identify the card incorrectly (on purpose.) With younger students it is a lot of fun for the teacher to pretend they don’t know the answer. If the student knows the correct answer, they take the teachers turn. For older students who are working on time signatures, it keeps them paying attention.

Whoever draws the Turkey card has “saved the turkey” and is the winner. The game is short, so the cards can be shuffled and played again.

I like the fact that even a beginner can win. All they have to do is draw the turkey card! However, along the way, they will be learning or reviewing important musical concepts. Let your younger children win most of the time. They love it and it really helps make lessons more fun. But older students love a challenge!

 

How to Print

Download the PDF to Set 1. In the PDF printer setting, set Print Range to  page 1. You do not want to print 2 pages right away because page 2 is the optional back of the cards. Please note that the backs are only found in Set 1.

Print the first page on sturdy card stock.

If you want to print the backs, re-insert the page back into the printer (so you can print the reverse side) and set Print Range to page 2.

To print the backs to the other levels, open Set 1 again and select page 2. Insert the pages from the other set back into your printer to print the backs. That is a lot of trouble, I admit, so you may want to just leave the backs blank or buy some Thanksgiving stickers for the backs. It depends on how good you are printing graphics.

After printing, cut the cards out along the dotted lines. If you have a lot of students, laminate them.

If you want to keep the levels sorted for easy use with different students, use colored card stock or label the cards before you print them.

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Filed under Games, Group lesson ideas, Thanksgiving, Theory

Come Ye Thankful People Come – Elementary

Come Ye Thankful People Come

Come Ye Thankful People Come

Today I am posting another well-known Thanksgiving hymn. I put off arranging this for beginners because I was undecided about how to present the dotted quarter note and the best way to write the treble A.

I finally decided to teach the rhythm by rote and use what is called “near middle C position” which is a nice way to say it isn’t in middle C position.

In this case, the right hand is in D minor position. I use this frequently because moving the thumb just slightly gives you “A.” What a difference it is to have one more note! What would Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star be without the treble A? In singing it is a very important note!

If both thumbs are on middle C and there is a treble A in the music, what can you do? Cross the left hand over to play it? Move the pinkie over every time there is an A? Shift the hand? Yes, all of these work and I think the teacher has to decide what is best for her particular students.

But if the song has other challenges, such as the dotted quarter note in this hymn, I think it is easier to write the right hand in D position. If this is a new position, some extra finger numbers and circling the skipping fingers will give them confidence that they can do it.

This might be a good time to mention that it is fairly easy to teach the dotted rhythm by rote. Substitute the words in the first phrase with London Bridge is Falling Down and tap it on the piano cover. Use both hands at first, and then use the correct hands. Change from hands to the correct fingers and play the phrase in the air, then the piano. Because I really want your students to enjoy this Thanksgiving hymn! PS It would be great for you to add some chords while they play an octave higher!

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Filed under Elementary Music, Thanksgiving

Now Thank We All Our God – Elementary

Now Thank We All Our God

Now Thank We All Our God is one of the great hymns and I have always planned to post a beginning arrangement. I put it off because there are many versions of the melody depending on which hymn book you’re looking at. So I had to make some editorial choices. I finally decided to write it like I learned it. Certainly you can change some of the notes because in no way do I say this is the correct version. It’s just one version among many.

Especially problematic for me were the fermatas and the layout of the upbeat. I finally decided to write the upbeats as they are usually written in hymnals, splitting the measures at the end of each line. I hope this can be a learning experience for our students and I don’t think it will be too hard to explain.

For beginning students, this is hymn is actually easier than some of the other traditional Thanksgiving hymns because of the simple rhythm and limited notes. Beginners may have problems with the two eighth notes, the fermatas, and the F sharp. Just use a lot of rote teaching in those places and that should solve the problems, because the notes are not that difficult. If your beginner can only play in middle C position, the right hand may be a little confusing, which is why I added some finger numbers in a few tricky spots. By moving one hand out of middle C position, many more tunes can be arranged for beginners, plus students don’t get stuck in C position for months.  For all my free Thanksgiving material, check out this link. 

 

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Filed under Sheet Music, Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving Games and Handouts

Thanksgiving Printables

Thanksgiving Games and Printables

Today I am posting the link where you can find all my Thanksgiving games and worksheets. There is a fun music bingo game there if you have groups between now and Thanksgiving. I hope you enjoy some of these.

How to Find More Holiday Printables on www.SusanParadis.com

  • Select “Free” at the top of this page. That opens a page that says “Newer Free Resources” and “Older Free Resources.”
  • Select “Newer Free Resources.”
  • Select “Holiday Resources”  from the categories listed on the page.
  • Select the holiday or season you want to open.
  • There will be pictures of everything pertaining to that season.
  • Click on the picture to open and print the file.

If you find a link that leads to nowhere, let me know. Sometimes things happen.

If you’re a long time follower of this blog, you can find some legacy material in “Older Free Resources.” However, as time permits, I update the old material and move it to “Newer Free Resources.” If you still can’t find what you want, the fastest way to find it is to do a Google search with my name and the name of what you want. An example is: Susan Paradis Thanksgiving Bingo.

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November 10, 2016 · 8:13 am