Now Thank We All Our God – Elementary

Now Thank We All Our God

Now Thank We All Our God is one of the great hymns and I have always planned to post a beginning arrangement. I put it off because there are many versions of the melody depending on which hymn book you’re looking at. So I had to make some editorial choices. I finally decided to write it like I learned it. Certainly you can change some of the notes because in no way do I say this is the correct version. It’s just one version among many.

Especially problematic for me were the fermatas and the layout of the upbeat. I finally decided to write the upbeats as they are usually written in hymnals, splitting the measures at the end of each line. I hope this can be a learning experience for our students and I don’t think it will be too hard to explain.

For beginning students, this is hymn is actually easier than some of the other traditional Thanksgiving hymns because of the simple rhythm and limited notes. Beginners may have problems with the two eighth notes, the fermatas, and the F sharp. Just use a lot of rote teaching in those places and that should solve the problems, because the notes are not that difficult. If your beginner can only play in middle C position, the right hand may be a little confusing, which is why I added some finger numbers in a few tricky spots. By moving one hand out of middle C position, many more tunes can be arranged for beginners, plus students don’t get stuck in C position for months.  For all my free Thanksgiving material, check out this link. 

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

Please follow and like us:
Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
Pinterest
Pinterest

Leave a Comment

Filed under Sheet Music, Thanksgiving

Make a List of Music Students Have Learned

Chart for 40 Piece Challenge

Music I Have Learned

Today I am sharing a chart your students can use to make a list of the music they have learned. My friend Marcia is doing a 30 Piece Challenge and she thought it would be helpful to have a chart for each student to list the name of the pieces they have learned. So I made one up to match the other balloon-themed material I’ve posted this year, such as the academic calendar and the freebie Key Signature Chart that is a test product in my store.

I created this file as an editable PDF, but only the title is editable, so you can use it for anything and call it anything you wish as long as the title fits in the space. To edit the form, simply click on the title and type over the text with whatever you wish the chart to be called. For example, you can title it “Scales I Know” and have students keep a list of the scales they have learned. Put it in your student’s binder and you’re good to go! I made it with space to list 40 items so it will work with the 40 Piece Challenge.

Have you heard of the 40 Piece Challenge? This is an idea thought up and shared by the imaginative piano composer, blogger, and piano instructor from Australia, Elissa Milne. You can read all about it here.

I first heard about Elissa’s idea at a MTNA convention about 3 years ago. Students set a goal to learn 40 pieces each year instead of only practicing the same several difficult pieces the entire year, neglecting easier pieces that help with sight reading and make piano more interesting and educational. The music doesn’t have to be memorized or polished to perfection like a competition piece. Now that her idea has spread all around the world, teachers with a shorter teaching schedule have tweaked it to require only 30 pieces.

To find all the material I’ve posted this year that matches this chart, select “Free” in the top menu. When the page opens, select “Teaching Aids” and start scrolling down to find the matching pages. There is a lot of material there!

 

Please follow and like us:
Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
Pinterest
Pinterest

5 Comments

Filed under Intermediate Students, Teaching Aids

Halloween Card and Autumn Bookmarks

Halloween Card with Pencil

Halloween Card

Here is a simple Halloween card you can give to your students next week. All you have to do is print it on card stock and cut out. Then, using a ruler as a guide, cut the 2 light-colored lines on the cards with a craft knife. These slits will be where you will insert a pencil. I found these easy to cut out because there are no little tiny bits to cut around!

I’ve found I can buy very inexpensive holiday pencils at nearby dollar stores. The ones I’m using are 12 pencils for a dollar.

Alternately, you can insert a lollipop or a glow stick which can also be found in packs at dollar stores.  You can also tape on a piece of candy.

If you use the free pre-reading and on-the-staff Halloween and Fall music I’ve posted over the years for beginners, you will recognize the art. Your young students will enjoy figuring out which songs the art goes with.

If you or your students prefer Autumn related activities, below is a link to some fall-themed bookmarks I posted previously. If you’ve been following my blog for a long time, you will recognize them. In the past, I have written a short message and taped some candy on the back. There are four bookmarks on the page and with all straight lines, they are easy to cut out with a paper-cutter.

Fall Bookmarks

 

SaveSave

Please follow and like us:
Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
Pinterest
Pinterest

5 Comments

Filed under Group lesson ideas, Halloween and Autumn, Preschool Music Resources

New Pre-reading Autumn and Halloween Sheets

Leaves Are Blowing and What Will I Be on Halloween are (free) beginning pre-reading pieces for young piano beginners. Years ago I published the companions to these pieces which you can find at this link: Free Halloween Music for Beginners

The originals were for the left hand and I never got around to making matching pieces for the right hand. Thanks to a reminder from a reader, that has been fixed now!

This set of pre-reading pieces not only help beginners learn the groups of two and three black keys, which of course, is essential if students are going to learn the names of piano keys, but they are also beginning composing pieces. In order to compose, students need to use their imagination and have a vision. I think it is safe to say composers get their start improvising and doodling around.

What I would like to see is students get carried away playing what they “will be” or how blowing leaves might be expressed on the piano. Sometimes teachers and parents get frustrated with students playing around on the piano and not practicing their assigned pieces.  But as long as there is a balance, who knows what budding Beethoven we might be cultivating!

Don’t forget you can save ink by printing only one copy and saving it in a sheet protector. You can also download these into your iPad to save on printing.

You have posted on Facebook and emailed me such precious videos of your students improvising and having fun! I hope your students have fun with these!

Please follow and like us:
Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
Pinterest
Pinterest

10 Comments

Filed under Composing Activities, Halloween and Autumn, Pre-reading, Preschool Music Resources